Kodi Community Forum
[Linux] HOW-TO achieve perfect playback at 23.97 or 59.94 Hz with NVIDIA GPU hardware - Printable Version

+- Kodi Community Forum (http://forum.kodi.tv)
+-- Forum: Announcements, Info, and General Discussion (/forumdisplay.php?fid=85)
+--- Forum: Tips, tricks, and step by step guides (/forumdisplay.php?fid=110)
+--- Thread: [Linux] HOW-TO achieve perfect playback at 23.97 or 59.94 Hz with NVIDIA GPU hardware (/showthread.php?tid=70068)

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36


- bobo1on1 - 2010-11-30 17:03

a_user Wrote:24p = 23.97fps
There's a difference between 24 and 23.976 hertz, but in case of xorg a 23.976 hertz mode will show up as 24.

In case of nvidia, you can get the real refreshrate by executing "nvidia-settings -q refreshrate3" in a terminal.


- Superorb - 2010-11-30 17:04

Yes, but a TV will display 24p and not 23.97p on the on screen info Wink


- rikardo1979 - 2010-11-30 17:17

Just want to say Thank you. Its save me a lot of time. Its work perfect with NVidia GT220. Finally I can watch all my BD Rips in smooth 24p :-)
Thanks m8
Wink Nod Cool


- a_user - 2010-11-30 17:18

bobo1on1 Wrote:There's a difference between 24 and 23.976 hertz, but in case of xorg a 23.976 hertz mode will show up as 24.

In case of nvidia, you can get the real refreshrate by executing "nvidia-settings -q refreshrate3" in a terminal.

no, the so called "24p" mode actually is NOT 24Hz. it is 23.976 Hz. All tvs that have 24p mode are in fact using 23.976Hz and not 24Hz!

there is no real 24Hz mode für tv or bluray movies. it is only called 24 cause it is simpler. the 24p mode is ALLWAYS 23.976 Hz.


- elupus - 2010-11-30 17:58

a_user:
Wrong.. My TV handles both 24 and 23.976 modes + i have samples that have both.


- a_user - 2010-11-30 18:03

elupus Wrote:a_user:
Wrong.. My TV handles both 24 and 23.976 modes + i have samples that have both.

EDIT: saw "you" is someone else Wink
my tv can handle 24 hz modes too. but the so called "24p" mode IS NOT 24Hz! it is 23.976Hz! it is the movie-mode/bluray-mode. this is 23.976Hz!

oh, and most tv allways show 24, no matter if it is 24hz or 23.976. but that's a different story.


- Superorb - 2010-11-30 18:24

elupus Wrote:a_user:
Wrong.. My TV handles both 24 and 23.976 modes + i have samples that have both.

Does your TV display 23.976 on screen when playing that content?


- rikardo1979 - 2010-11-30 18:29

I wonder too :-)
it's prob shows the 24p


- a_user - 2010-11-30 18:50

Superorb Wrote:Does your TV display 23.976 on screen when playing that content?

no. as i said. most tv display allways 24.

23.976Hz is the cinema movie frequency. it is used on blurays (and it is allways this when you have cinema movies on blurays). this is called the 24p mode. tv that support the 24p mode are setting there refresh rate to 23.976Hz BUT most of them disply 1920x1080@24 (for full hd).

my tv has an integrated media player that supports this mode. it even is explained in the handbook and technical sheet.


- X3lectric - 2010-11-30 18:52

Pls read about moving image formats
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moving_image_formats
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frame_rate

23.976 is actually OFFICIALLY NTSC playback frame rate.

You can get.

05 fps
10 fps
12 fps
15 fps
23.976 fps
24 fps
25 fps
29.97 fps

this according to handbrake.

all these include PAL and NTSC rates.

WHile XBMC does adjust refresh rate Im not sure that is enough for content which has been poorly encoded.

Perhaps there is a better way for xbmc to manage this. bobo1on1 has been working on this but I think its still (while better in some cases) room for improvement...

Please read post #226

X3lectric Wrote:You can now adjust/override the display fps~refresh via advancedsettings.xml like this.
Code:
<advancedsettings>
<video>
  <adjustrefreshrate>
    <override>
      <fpsmin>29.96</fpsmin>
      <fpsmax>30.01</fpsmax>
      <refresh>50</refresh>
    </override>
    <override>
      <fpsmin>23.96</fpsmin>
      <fpsmax>24.01</fpsmax>
      <refresh>24</refresh>
    </override>
    <override>
      <fpsmin>24.99</fpsmin>
      <fpsmax>25.01</fpsmax>
      <refresh>25</refresh>
    </override>
  </adjustrefreshrate>
</video>
</advancedsettings>
If your TV supports 30Hz then choose to override refresh just by changing the <refresh>XX</refresh> or define whatever value you like. If it stutters at a particular fps increase the refresh rate.

This should help you guys and you can thank bobo1on1.

Also if your connected via HDMI the modelines it uses are denoted by CEA-861B Format X? e.g like below
Code:
#  "1920x1080_60_0"     : 1920 x 1080 @ 59.94/60 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 16[/b][/color])
#  "1920x1080_50"       : 1920 x 1080 @ 50 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 31[/b][/color])
#  "1920x1080_30"       : 1920 x 1080 @ 29.97/30 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 34[/b][/color])
#  "1920x1080_25"       : 1920 x 1080 @ 25 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 33)
[/b][/color]#  "1920x1080_24"       : 1920 x 1080 @ 23.97/24 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 32[/b][/color])
#  "1920x1080_60i"      : 1920 x 1080 @ 59.94/60 Hz ([color=Red][b]CEA-861B Format 5[/b][/color])
The above shows the modes your TV should support. For 720p TV's your looking for e.g. "1280x720_60_0" : 1280 x 720 @ 59.94/60 Hz (CEA-861B Format 4)

I think you guys need to do a bit of reading to understand what is what....


- Superorb - 2010-11-30 18:52

a_user Wrote:no. as i said. most tv display allways 24.

23.976Hz is the cinema movie frequency. it is used on blurays (and it is allways this when you have cinema movies on blurays). this is called the 24p mode. tv that support the 24p mode are setting there refresh rate to 23.976Hz BUT most of them disply 1920x1080@24 (for full hd).

my tv has an integrated media player that supports this mode. it even is explained in the handbook and technical sheet.
You're preaching to the choir. It was said earlier than their TV supports both 24p and 23.97p. My TV will play both as well, but it will always be displayed as 24p when I look at the source info on the TV.


- X3lectric - 2010-11-30 19:59

a_user Wrote:no. as i said. most tv display allways 24.

23.976Hz is the cinema movie frequency. it is used on blurays (and it is allways this when you have cinema movies on blurays). this is called the 24p mode. tv that support the 24p mode are setting there refresh rate to 23.976Hz BUT most of them disply 1920x1080@24 (for full hd).

my tv has an integrated media player that supports this mode. it even is explained in the handbook and technical sheet.

No 23.976Hz is default NTSC fps... Cinema fps is not the same in fact its 24p b;uray and HD use 24p so your not right...

wikipedia Wrote:24p in high definition disc formats

Both HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc support the 24p frame rate, but technical implementations of this mode are different among the two formats. Blu-ray Disc supports 24p with its native timing, while HD DVD uses 60i timing for 24p (replacing missing frames with "repeat field flags").[5]

wikipedia Wrote:There are currently (2010) three main frame rate standards in the TV and movie-making business: 24p, 25p, and 30p. However there are many variations on these as well as newer emerging standards.

wikipedia Wrote:Originally moving picture film was shot and projected at various speeds using hand-cranked cameras and projectors; though 1000 frames per minute (16⅔ frame/s) is generally cited as a standard silent speed, research indicates most films were shot between 16 frame/s and 23 frame/s and projected from 18 frame/s on up (often reels included instructions on how fast each scene should be shown).[9] When sound film was introduced in the late 1920s, a constant speed was required for the sound head. 24 frames per second was chosen because it was the slowest (and thus cheapest) speed which allowed for sufficient sound quality. Improvements since the late 19th century include the mechanization of cameras — allowing them to record at a consistent speed, quiet camera design — allowing sound recorded on-set to be usable without requiring large "blimps" to encase the camera, the invention of more sophisticated filmstocks and lenses, allowing directors to film in increasingly dim conditions, and the development of synchronized sound, allowing sound to be recorded at exactly the same speed as its corresponding action. The soundtrack can be recorded separately from shooting the film, but for live-action pictures many parts of the soundtrack are usually recorded simultaneously.
Read up get informed and dont post confusing info... read my previous post as well.


- TheSwissKnife - 2010-12-01 03:21

a_user Wrote:no. as i said. most tv display allways 24.

23.976Hz is the cinema movie frequency. it is used on blurays (and it is allways this when you have cinema movies on blurays). this is called the 24p mode. tv that support the 24p mode are setting there refresh rate to 23.976Hz BUT most of them disply 1920x1080@24 (for full hd).

my tv has an integrated media player that supports this mode. it even is explained in the handbook and technical sheet.

Some blurays (of cinema based films) are 24.000Hz though most are 23.976Hz (or 24/1.001Hz).


- X3lectric - 2010-12-01 10:29

TheSwissKnife Wrote:Some blurays (of cinema based films) are 24.000Hz though most are 23.976Hz (or 24/1.001Hz).
clearly my post **fell on deaf ears. DOes anyone bother reading facts before posting?

Its more like The blurays are 24p in their majority while only some are 23.976... since 24p has been widely used and accepted over other fps.

some blog Wrote:Since movies are filmed at 24 frames per second, you'd want to use an even multiple of 24 (such as 72 frames per second) to avoid motion artifacts in slow-panning scenes. If you display 24-fps content at an uneven multiple, like the commonly used 60 fps, you'll end up with those artifacts

**edit thx to superorb super pedantic powers... lol... thx mate Wink


- a_user - 2010-12-01 12:17

Superorb Wrote:Does your TV display 23.976 on screen when playing that content?

X3lectric Wrote:clearly my post fell into death ears. DOes anyone bother reading facts before posting?

Its more like The blurays are 24p in their majority while only some are 23.976... since 24p has been widely used and accepted over other fps.

i still never saw one with 24hz. all i saw up to today say 24p on the cover and are 23.97 Hz (information that any player gives me about it). but maybe it is noly my movie collection... who knows.