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Full Version: HOW TO - Kodi 2D - 3D - UHD (4k) HDR Guide Internal & External Players
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Does anyone actually use the setup in this thread with AMD ? I bought a Ryzen 2400G motherboard as a candidate Kodi box, but kodi crashes whenever it tries to do frame packed 3d. Asked here already, but no reply. Will certainly try MPC-BE+MadVR to have another program attempt to switch on Frame Packed 3D, but would be lovely to get reports if its known to work or not. I've also not seen anything at all about 3D in AMDs config program/GUI, which makes me somewhat suspicious, but then again, Intel doesn't have that either...
And... i also can't figure out how to make NVidia work reasonably in my setup. Issue is that i use projector, and whenever frame packed 3D is used, projector switches display to color/brightness setup that only makes sense with glasses... which is kinda nice.... except that there is no 2D-1080p24 resolution set up by NVidia, so all 2D movies also run into this issue. I tried to create a custom 2D 1080p resolution, but can't get kodi to switch to that. Maybe with one of the external players thats easier ... ? Also posted here in before.

Thanks!
(2019-07-11, 18:06)te36 Wrote: [ -> ]
(2019-07-11, 17:52)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]For you guys that need to use latest nVidia drivers to keep up with your game support but still desire 3D support (which was dropped), have a look here https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic...played-/1/

I don't need gaming drivers and have not tested.  I continue to use v.416.81.

Thanks a lot. I will certainly try, especially because i also have a 144hz desktop for gaming. If it does work indeed, then it might so for a few versions until Nvidia Devs do that start breaking things for 3d in driver updates *sigh*. Petition would still be good. 
I concur 100%. I'm also looking around for said petition. I'm also inclined to start a website for it if I can find some support. I dropped $1.5K on RTX 2080 Ti water-cooled & everything for my Gaming. I don't do 3D Gaming but my rig couples as HTPC and used to do 3D Movies. A month after I bought the card 3D Support was gone - I had no inclination. Very disappointing. 

Anyhow, thanks for the link, @brazen1 - I'll be looking into it. Appreciate it.
(2019-07-11, 17:52)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]For you guys that need to use latest nVidia drivers to keep up with your game support but still desire 3D support (which was dropped), have a look here https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic...played-/1/

I don't need gaming drivers and have not tested.  I continue to use v.416.81.

I can confirm: This works!! I'm now using the latest nVidia Drivers, 431.60, with full Stereoscopic 3D support, including all prior options in nVidia Control Panel.

Tested 3D Blu-ray ISO in PowerDVD 19 Ultra. 3D Working flawlessly. 

I did need to deviate from the original instructions and want to provide a few tips to those looking for the same:
  • I strongly suggest *NOT* to use DDU for removing the drivers, as suggested by the Guide. DDU is a very powerful and highly destructive software, especially in Safe Mode. It can really screw up your Registry and cause more headaches, as it did in my case. I spent the better part of my day restoring my system from the destruction caused by DDU. Just use "Uninstall" from the Control Panel. It is more than sufficient. 
  • Like many users, Windows 10 inadvertently converted my Graphics Driver from "Standard" to "DCH". You cannot use the instructions or links provided in the Guide if you have a DCH driver installed. You cannot install Standard over DCH, or DCH over Standard. I had to use a completely different resource from the Internet to successfully remove "DCH" Graphics Driver from my system. Once this was done, I was able to install the Standard drivers. 
So to recap my steps:
  1. Uninstall current nVidia Graphics Driver from Control Panel. Remove all nVidia related software using Uninstall & Reboot
  2. If you have DCH Package installed (Click on "System Information" in nVidia Control Panel to find out), you will need to completely remove the DCH Package (You will need to be Offline - Disable Network Adapter while doing all of this). I'll post the link to these instructions here later, or just google it. 
  3. Install Standard Driver which contains the 3DVision package
  4. Install latest Standard Driver overwriting the previous installation (Make sure you have Copied 3DVision package to this driver's folders)
  5. Use FVIE software to change the version of the two files mentioned in the guide to the latest version - "3160" in my case. It's the last 4 digits of the version, example "431.60" gives us "3160".
  6. Reboot
That's it! Stereoscopic 3D becomes part of your latest driver and works flawlessly.

Image
That's very interesting stuff to know about. Thank you so much for the valuable information.
How do i remove the OSD text appearing on the movie player as seen here

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Does anyone know if DVDFab Player 3 (the version which automatically switches Windows OS to HDR) is available anywhere? Any place to get it from? I'm only seeing DVDFab Player 5 everywhere. Can't seem to find 3 anywhere. Thanks.
(2019-08-07, 19:28)MANswers Wrote: [ -> ]How do i remove the OSD text appearing on the movie player as seen here

Image
Try ctrl j
MANswers, if you've used the madVR .bin I've linked in this thread, use Ctrl + Z.  You can change it back to Ctrl + J if you want.  I changed it because it interfered with a previously assigned keymap.

I've recently setup a dual boot system so I could do a complete fresh install of my Windows workstation including everything home theatre related.  It's been years and I've noticed things I experiment with that should work... don't.  Here's what I did:

I made a system image of my old SSD C: and installed a spare 4TB HDD.  I put the system image on the 4TB and formatted my SSD.  The SSD will once again be my 'new' C: I reinstall on.
I can refer back to my old system on the 4TB to help reinstall everything new on the SSD.  Dual booting each makes it a breeze.  I can even see the 4TB drive when booted into the SSD which makes file retrieval quicker.  For visual settings a .ini will not reveal, I simply boot to the old image on the 4TB and take screenshots I can refer to when I boot into the SSD.  I've limited the amount of 'things' I can simply drop into the new install.  I really want to set most everything fresh by hand.  I can do this slowly as the 4TB still functions so I'm not left out in the cold.  Now that the fresh install on the SSD is nearing completion, I find myself rarely booting the old image on the 4TB.

The problem with dual booting is that you can't have two C: drives.  One or the other must be selected.  In disc management I left one with no drive letter.  It appears W10 has made dual booting a bit harder than previous versions because that wasn't anywhere near enough and editing advanced boot settings is no pleasure either.  I simply could not get it to obey.  I broke my rules and used EasyBCD to cheat.  This software really is a lifesaver for dual booting W10 and it was quick and easy.  Now I'm presented with 2 C: drives during the boot sequence to choose from.

I'm nearly done resetting up my newly formatted SSD.  It won't be long before I remove the 4TB, format it, and use it as another additional data drive.  I recently picked up a couple new External WD 8TB HDD's for a couple hundred bucks that were installed as even more data drives.  I must say, I've always been 'taught' that WD is 'the way to go' especially reds.  After shucking my drives they are both whites.  TBH, I don't care for them at all.  I think hype drives them to the top of the HDD market.  They do not transfer files anywhere near the speed my other 8TB shucked Seagate green drives do and always have.  I'm actually disappointed but for $100 each, I'll keep them in use.  Also, W10 (a fresh install of pro) had a hell of a time formatting them properly in disk management.  I've always used it for Seagates with no problems.  After tisking and cursing them a few times I turned to my trusty MiniTool Partition Wizard Pro.  This program has always performed miracles on pesky drives for me and didn't let me down this time either.  Needless to say, after transferring files around and retiring smaller drives to backup, I've managed to fill one of them up and I'm happy.  I understand the shucked WD drives have to use a molex power plug or you can also cover up or eliminate one of the contacts instead.  What a joke.  I'll stick with Seagate drives.  I learned my real world lesson. 

Fwiw, I now have 37 HDD's in use.  10 in my HTPC and 27 external for backup.  HTPC and Backup are = sizes.  There are more drives in Backup because they are smaller retired drives.  37 drives presents a problem when it comes to drive letters in Windows.  The 27 in backup use a couple dynamic joins to save letters.  I find symbolic links and/or raid array alternatives problematic tbh.  I don't desire to spend needless money if I don't have to when it comes to parity.  Most of the backup drives are in 3 Sans Digital port duplicator enclosures.  The RocketRaid eSata controllers that came with them are a joke as are the ones on my MB.  Somehow I manage to keep them going with W7 drivers.  The rest of the drives for backup are external drives in their enclosures.  They are USB 3.0.  9 of them.  I use W10 storage spaces to control them and everything groups together in JBOD.  I'm aware that if one drive fails in any of the arrays, I lose data for that array.  All of it is 1:1 so I really don't care if it ever happened... knock on wood.  Besides, the backup drives are never powered until needed.  Some if these drives are nearly 20 years old including one IDE in a USB output enclosure.

I noticed something of interest during this fresh install and I think the question was raised here in this forum.  I don't remember the outcome of the conversation and I know time has passed but I'll share:
The question was why does PowerDVD insist on being the default player for specific media even though the code is correct in the playercorefactory.xml for a different player to default.  Well, this happened to me during this new setup.  It's W10 autoplay options.  It appears the install of PDVD associates itself with certain medias even though you didn't select anything to associate when installing and that you've checked nothing in it's settings after installing.  Simply go to settings/Devices/Autoplay and turn off autoplay.  For more control, go to the control panel and select autoplay.  There you'll be presented all the options beyond simply on/off.

That's my latest journey.  AFAICT, everything on the HTPC Workstation Homefront is working very well.  The minor niggles I had before starting fresh have magically disappeared and 'things' that should work... do.  Tongue
(2019-09-14, 02:08)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]MANswers, if you've used the madVR .bin I've linked in this thread, use Ctrl + Z.  You can change it back to Ctrl + J if you want.  I changed it because it interfered with a previously assigned keymap.

I've recently setup a dual boot system so I could do a complete fresh install of my Windows workstation including everything home theatre related.  It's been years and I've noticed things I experiment with that should work... don't.  Here's what I did:

I made a system image of my old SSD C: and installed a spare 4TB HDD.  I put the system image on the 4TB and formatted my SSD.  The SSD will once again be my 'new' C: I reinstall on.
I can refer back to my old system on the 4TB to help reinstall everything new on the SSD.  Dual booting each makes it a breeze.  I can even see the 4TB drive when booted into the SSD which makes file retrieval quicker.  For visual settings a .ini will not reveal, I simply boot to the old image on the 4TB and take screenshots I can refer to when I boot into the SSD.  I've limited the amount of 'things' I can simply drop into the new install.  I really want to set most everything fresh by hand.  I can do this slowly as the 4TB still functions so I'm not left out in the cold.  Now that the fresh install on the SSD is nearing completion, I find myself rarely booting the old image on the 4TB.

The problem with dual booting is that you can't have two C: drives.  One or the other must be selected.  In disc management I left one with no drive letter.  It appears W10 has made dual booting a bit harder than previous versions because that wasn't anywhere near enough and editing advanced boot settings is no pleasure either.  I simply could not get it to obey.  I broke my rules and used EasyBCD to cheat.  This software really is a lifesaver for dual booting W10 and it was quick and easy.  Now I'm presented with 2 C: drives during the boot sequence to choose from.

I'm nearly done resetting up my newly formatted SSD.  It won't be long before I remove the 4TB, format it, and use it as another additional data drive.  I recently picked up a couple new External WD 8TB HDD's for a couple hundred bucks that were installed as even more data drives.  I must say, I've always been 'taught' that WD is 'the way to go' especially reds.  After shucking my drives they are both whites.  TBH, I don't care for them at all.  I think hype drives them to the top of the HDD market.  They do not transfer files anywhere near the speed my other 8TB shucked Seagate green drives do and always have.  I'm actually disappointed but for $100 each, I'll keep them in use.  Also, W10 (a fresh install of pro) had a hell of a time formatting them properly in disk management.  I've always used it for Seagates with no problems.  After tisking and cursing them a few times I turned to my trusty MiniTool Partition Wizard Pro.  This program has always performed miracles on pesky drives for me and didn't let me down this time either.  Needless to say, after transferring files around and retiring smaller drives to backup, I've managed to fill one of them up and I'm happy.  I understand the shucked WD drives have to use a molex power plug or you can also cover up or eliminate one of the contacts instead.  What a joke.  I'll stick with Seagate drives.  I learned my real world lesson. 

Fwiw, I now have 37 HDD's in use.  10 in my HTPC and 27 external for backup.  HTPC and Backup are = sizes.  There are more drives in Backup because they are smaller retired drives.  37 drives presents a problem when it comes to drive letters in Windows.  The 27 in backup use a couple dynamic joins to save letters.  I find symbolic links and/or raid array alternatives problematic tbh.  I don't desire to spend needless money if I don't have to when it comes to parity.  Most of the backup drives are in 3 Sans Digital port duplicator enclosures.  The RocketRaid eSata controllers that came with them are a joke as are the ones on my MB.  Somehow I manage to keep them going with W7 drivers.  The rest of the drives for backup are external drives in their enclosures.  They are USB 3.0.  9 of them.  I use W10 storage spaces to control them and everything groups together in JBOD.  I'm aware that if one drive fails in any of the arrays, I lose data for that array.  All of it is 1:1 so I really don't care if it ever happened... knock on wood.  Besides, the backup drives are never powered until needed.  Some if these drives are nearly 20 years old including one IDE in a USB output enclosure.

I noticed something of interest during this fresh install and I think the question was raised here in this forum.  I don't remember the outcome of the conversation and I know time has passed but I'll share:
The question was why does PowerDVD insist on being the default player for specific media even though the code is correct in the playercorefactory.xml for a different player to default.  Well, this happened to me during this new setup.  It's W10 autoplay options.  It appears the install of PDVD associates itself with certain medias even though you didn't select anything to associate when installing and that you've checked nothing in it's settings after installing.  Simply go to settings/Devices/Autoplay and turn off autoplay.  For more control, go to the control panel and select autoplay.  There you'll be presented all the options beyond simply on/off.

That's my latest journey.  AFAICT, everything on the HTPC Workstation Homefront is working very well.  The minor niggles I had before starting fresh have magically disappeared and 'things' that should work... do.  Tongue
have you considered unraid ? its linux based but the latest variant can work with Virtual machines.  It will give some measure of protection to your media files
What would I gain from that except giving up 2 of the largest drives for parity that could otherwise be used for storage making it not very cost effective?  I already have protection of my media files.  The originals within the HTPC drives and exact duplicates on backup drives.  If any of the HTPC drives was to fail, I replace the failed drive and copy lost files over from backup.  If any of the backup drives was to fail, I replace the drive and copy lost files over from the HTPC.  Honestly, what is the advantage of a raid configuration like unraid going to do except automatically backup and/or rebuild?  I'm not too lazy to copy and paste myself.
(2019-09-17, 17:07)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]What would I gain from that except giving up 2 of the largest drives for parity that could otherwise be used for storage making it not very cost effective?  I already have protection of my media files.  The originals within the HTPC drives and exact duplicates on backup drives.  If any of the HTPC drives was to fail, I replace the failed drive and copy lost files over from backup.  If any of the backup drives was to fail, I replace the drive and copy lost files over from the HTPC.  Honestly, what is the advantage of a raid configuration like unraid going to do except automatically backup and/or rebuild?  I'm not too lazy to copy and paste myself.
1) Time. I believe UNRAID server would be faster recovering from already mentioned scenario of failed hard drive. Yes, it can be a bit of a PITA to set up from ground 0 as there's a bit to learn but worth it overall over the course of say 3-4 years

2) Accessing all data outside of the HTPC. I use my Apple TV to access some of the data from UNRAID server - though I do save 4K and 3D for my hardcore HTPC. I use other desktops, latops etc to access data on the UNRAID server from documents (more later) and, say, if I've got a few minutes and know I have some FRINGE Extras to watch for 4 minutes just as an example.

3) Emby as a cataloguer integrates well. And if you are standing at Best Buy looking at a $15 4K copy of LOGAN and don't remember if you bought it or not, well, check your iPhone to see if Logan is in your collection through the Emby app, which can query your Unraid emby software 'server' from cell phone

4) the nerdiness of it. Yet something else to play with. The holy grail would be an Unraid server with a virtual HTPC inside it that can do all the fancy things an HTPC can do (defined by me for my needs as 3D, 4K, and Aeon MADNOX skin support) without the hardware. I'm not smart enough to pull this off, but every so often I tinker for a couple hours. But separate from that, I use my unraid server to store tax forms and all important documents such as mortgage papers and such because it's easier and the shared drive is auto-backed up.

5) iTunes Library - I put all my music and photos on it as my iTunes library. Well, that's my dream. It's not my core iTunes library but more or less a backup of it that I can use various apps to play music off from my receiver(s) on different floors than my Unraid server.
(2019-08-01, 18:00)booms1 Wrote: [ -> ]That's very interesting stuff to know about. Thank you so much for the valuable information.

http://www.crunchytricks.com/2017/03/m4b-to-mp3-converters.html

Thanks, for posting this.
I was wondering if someone has tried the latest DVDFab Player 6 - mainly that if it auto-switches HDR on/off?