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Hey Guys,

I really need your advice on this one. This is driving me insane Wink lol So I am trying to get the absolute best video settings on my HTPC and I know of 2 settings and want to know which is the absoulte correct one. Please see my equipment below:

Projector : Sony HW40ES

HTPC - ATI Radeon Graphics Card

SETTING 1:

ATI Radeon graphics Card is 0-255 selected, and FULL RGB 4:4:4
KODI is also FULL colour as I have not ticked the limited colour space
Projector is selected to output LIMITED

DXVA 2 is enable in this option

Result: everything seems absolutely fine, no black crushing etc all good

SETTING 2:

ATI Radeon graphics Card is 0-255 selected, and FULL RGB 4:4:4
KODI is also selceted to display LIMITED 16-235 colour space
Projector is selected to output FULL

DXVA 2 is disabled in this option.

Result: everything seems absolutely fine, no black crushing.

What I am trying to discover is which of the above 2 settings is correct without any conversions as I am aware that Bluray Remux and all movies are shot in YUV 420p.

Also wanted to know is it reccomended to enable DXVA2 in KODI or not?

Many thanks
Especially if you're using Windows, neither. RGB FULL for everything and recalibrate. Don't rely on default calibration judgement. Hardware acceleration (DXVA) on if you're GPU has any grunt force otherwise it will fight what the CPU might decode better.

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-displa...ation.html

https://lifehacker.com/5858625/how-to-ca...es-or-less

More details in the guide in my signature post #205.
(2017-07-22, 17:39)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]More details in the guide in my signature post #205.

Just stumbled upon this posting and took a look at your guide. Saved the URL to Google Keep with a location reminder set up so I can follow it when I get back home.

I'm all over the "map" trying to figure out what the best settings are for my Sammy TV+Onkyo+Nvidia GPU. Constantly tweaking and changing stuff.
(2017-07-22, 17:39)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]Especially if you're using Windows, neither. RGB FULL for everything and recalibrate. Don't rely on default calibration judgement. Hardware acceleration (DXVA) on if you're GPU has any grunt force otherwise it will fight what the CPU might decode better.

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-displa...ation.html

https://lifehacker.com/5858625/how-to-ca...es-or-less

More details in the guide in my signature post #205.


Sorry I am. I have understanding what you mean? Are you saying I should have everything set to full rgb? I don't think that's correct because there will be two lots of conversations that way..

Look at this post below and read section 2.2 for confirmation :

Video_levels_and_color_space (wiki)

From what I understand this says kodi should be limited enabled, gpu full rgb and projector limited.. These seem to be the correct settings along with DXVA2 off.
(2017-07-21, 22:03)mkohman Wrote: [ -> ]What I am trying to discover is which of the above 2 settings is correct without any conversions as I am aware that Bluray Remux and all movies are shot in YUV 420p.

The colour space of the source is irrelevant becuase computer graphics operates in RGB and the display is RGB too. Setting the driver to anything other than RGB introduces unnecessary conversions.
(2017-07-22, 18:51)FernetMenta Wrote: [ -> ]
(2017-07-21, 22:03)mkohman Wrote: [ -> ]What I am trying to discover is which of the above 2 settings is correct without any conversions as I am aware that Bluray Remux and all movies are shot in YUV 420p.

The colour space of the source is irrelevant becuase computer graphics operates in RGB and the display is RGB too. Setting the driver to anything other than RGB introduces unnecessary conversions.

Ok so what should my settings be please elaborate...

GPU to FULL RGB 4:4:4

KODI uncheck 16-235

Sony Projector FULL

Is that what your saying? Also DXVA2 enabled or no?

Thank you..
Calibration is a science. Without going overboard, I find the KISS method (Keep It Simple Stupid) acceptable to anyone's standard imo. I know this highly debatable but works for me. In the end, you want to see details in bright scenes (like the definition in clouds) as bright as possible but not lose detail (wash out). Same with blacks. You want to see the details in shadows but be as black as can be without (crushing) and not seeing those details. Native color settings are not only a requirement with some formats but very, very, close to realism. So, custom color settings are a waste of time imo, unless your display is waaaay off to begin with.

Before calibrating, know your basic settings. They are not going to change. If they do, your calibration will have to be recalibrated so do it correct the 1st time. Selecting a color space is priority one. There are many options and opinions. There are many documentations and opinions supporting them. What they fail to reveal is the downsides and often overemphasize the upsides, mostly post processing.

I find the bottom line for me is a color space interacting well with video and desktop. Without getting into a ton of in one ear and out the other over information, setting RGB Full 4:4:4 12bit is the only conclusion that works for what users here do. Anything else is going to introduce banding and a way too dark desktop. When you view the settings before calibrating you will think you did something wrong and quickly change it. The key is to calibrate after the settings. You will end up with BTB and WTW in Video and Desktop modes and you will be happy. You should also consider the many post processes your display offers. They are there for a reason and the manufacturer knows this although you might not. Most purists say to turn em' all off because you'll introduce junk to your untainted source. To each his own.

You may think this is beyond the scope of your abilities. Fortunately, a free calibration disc is available as are instructions. The 1st time you do it will take an hour or so of fumbling and checking. After that you will be an old hand at it and do it in 10 minutes. All you are really doing is setting the optimal brightness, backlight, sharpness and contrast while checking for other things that are more than likely fine where they're at. (I know, subjective). If those other tidbits defaults are not fine, you have real bad display on your hands and some work to do. Further fine tuning is done by what your eye likes, not what your told they should like. Remember, you have to calibrate EVERY input and EVERY mode. They will all calibrate differently. Your cable box is going to require something completely different than your 2D Blu-ray as will your 3D mode as opposed to HDR mode for example.

DXVA. I use it on. My GPU is pretty strong. Much stronger than my CPU. It's usually better to hardware decode vs software decode. Most newer GPU's take advantage of the higher specs being introduced. We don't know what you have and we may or may not have tested it even if we did. That is for you to test. Flip a switch and play some videos. I can only suggest if a newer GPU is on the horizon, you select Nvidia. They consistently parallel state of the art or try to par it asap. The same can't be said for Intel or AMD. That's just the way it is at this time.

Don't be intimidated. Weigh out your advice. Get your hands dirty..... and reap the rewards of your determination. You'll be pleased with yourself and so will those sitting next to you.
(2017-07-23, 01:43)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]Calibration is a science.  Without going overboard, I find the KISS method  (Keep It Simple Stupid) acceptable to anyone's standard imo.  I know this highly debatable but works for me.  In the end, you want to see details in bright scenes (like the definition in clouds) as bright as possible but not lose detail (wash out).  Same with blacks.  You want to see the details in shadows but be as black as can be without (crushing) and not seeing those details.  Native color settings are not only a requirement with some formats but very, very, close to realism.  So, custom color settings are a waste of time imo, unless your display is waaaay off to begin with.

Before calibrating, know your basic settings.  They are not going to change.  If they do, your calibration will have to be recalibrated so do it correct the 1st time.  Selecting a color space is priority one.  There are many options and opinions.  There are many documentations and opinions supporting them.  What they fail to reveal is the downsides and often overemphasize the upsides, mostly post processing.

I find the bottom line for me is a color space interacting well with video and desktop.  Without getting into a ton of in one ear and out the other over information, setting RGB Full 4:4:4 12bit is the only conclusion that works for what users here do.  Anything else is going to introduce banding and a way too dark desktop.  When you view the settings before calibrating you will think you did something wrong and quickly change it.  The key is to calibrate after the settings.  You will end up with BTB and WTW in Video and Desktop modes and you will be happy.  You should also consider the many post processes your display offers.  They are there for a reason and the manufacturer knows this although you might not.  Most purists say to turn em' all off because you'll introduce junk to your untainted source.  To each his own.  

You may think this is beyond the scope of your abilities.  Fortunately, a free calibration disc is available as are instructions.  The 1st time you do it will take an hour or so of fumbling and checking.  After that you will be an old hand at it and do it in 10 minutes.  All you are really doing is setting the optimal brightness, backlight, sharpness and contrast while checking for other things that are more than likely fine where they're at. (I know, subjective).  If those other tidbits defaults are not fine, you have real bad display on your hands and some work to do.  Further fine tuning is done by what your eye likes, not what your told they should like.  Remember, you have to calibrate EVERY input and EVERY mode.  They will all calibrate differently.  Your cable box is going to require something completely different than your 2D Blu-ray as will your 3D mode as opposed to HDR mode for example.

DXVA.  I use it on.  My GPU is pretty strong.  Much stronger than my CPU.  It's usually better to hardware decode vs software decode.  Most newer GPU's take advantage of the higher specs being introduced.  We don't know what you have and we may or may not have tested it even if we did.  That is for you to test.  Flip a switch and play some videos.  I can only suggest if a newer GPU is on the horizon, you select Nvidia.  They consistently parallel state of the art or try to par it asap.  The same can't be said for Intel or AMD.  That's just the way it is at this time.

Don't be intimidated.  Weigh out your advice.  Get your hands dirty..... and reap the rewards of your determination.  You'll be pleased with yourself and so will those sitting next to you.

Hi there sorry for the late reply which nvidia card would you reccomend for HTpc bluray and 4k movie viewing without bring an overkill.. Im not interested in gaming at all. Purely movie viewing nothing else. Cheers 
I use a GTX 960 4GB. I wouldn't consider anything less than 4GB with hardware decoding and nothing hybrid decoding. It plays anything well except certain streamed vp9 youtube videos which I have no desire anyway. A GTX 1060 would be an even better choice at 6GB or any other 10xx models but the price increases for little gain from the 9xx models if you can still find them. Be aware, just because the model number is higher does not mean it is a better card than a lower model number in a series. A new line of NVidia cards (Volta) anticipated to be released early 2018 are another consideration though the price may not sit well with the faint of heart. In all honesty, if there is a card that does it all, I don't need a card that does it all 'better'. Better to me would be higher settings in madVR although I'm perfectly happy with what I'm presently accomplishing. Rip time is another consideration but I'm in no hurry to shave a minute or an hour. Gaming would be a huge factor between cards but I don't game either so......
(2017-10-30, 16:37)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]I use a GTX 960 4GB.  I wouldn't consider anything less than 4GB with hardware decoding and nothing hybrid decoding.  It plays anything well except certain streamed vp9 youtube videos which I have no desire anyway.  A GTX 1060 would be an even better choice at 6GB or any other 10xx models but the price increases for little gain from the 9xx models if you can still find them.  Be aware, just because the model number is higher does not mean it is a better card than a lower model number in a series.  A new line of NVidia cards (Volta) anticipated to be released early 2018 are another consideration though the price may not sit well with the faint of heart.  In all honesty, if there is a card that does it all, I don't need a card that does it all 'better'.  Better to me would be higher settings in madVR although I'm perfectly happy with what I'm presently accomplishing.  Rip time is another consideration but I'm in no hurry to shave a minute or an hour.  Gaming would be a huge factor between cards but I don't game either so......

Thank you for your reply. I currently have an ATI Sapphire 6450 (http://www.sapphiretech.com/productdetia...D&lang=eng) which I am happy with and the image is clean and sharp. I also have a Darbee Darblet DVP5000s.

What will the GTX 960 or 980 or 1060 bring to the table that my card currently isn't bringing? I am just curious.. as I don't really want to splash out cash on something that I may not notice any difference in . I would really like your honest opinion .. Thank you very much and I appreciate all your help.

Also would you please be so kind to take a screen shop of your madVR settings as I am curios to know what kind of settings your able to achieve. Thank you so much Smile
Can't comment on the ATI nor the differences. If you like it, that's all that matters. I was going to add my madVR settings to the guide but every card is different as are the profiles different folks would be interested in. There are some relevant pictures in there related to the thread though. Fwiw, I think FSE, D3D, Image NGU Sharp on high, Chroma NGU AA on medium and ordered dithering are of most importance and that's what I use. I'm not able to use the new RR or RCA as it's just too demanding on my 960. Not sure I'm missing out on anything though as my playback looks pretty good for just about everything to me. The entire pre-process helps with 'Sharpness' setting in my display set at 21 out of 100, when it used to be 71 after calibrating without madVR. I think that's quite an improvement out of a used card I paid $125 for.
(2017-10-30, 19:15)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]Can't comment on the ATI nor the differences.  If you like it, that's all that matters.  I was going to add my madVR settings to the guide but every card is different as are the profiles different folks would be interested in.  There are some relevant pictures in there related to the thread though.  Fwiw, I think FSE, D3D, Image NGU Sharp on high, Chroma NGU AA on medium and ordered dithering are of most importance and that's what I use.  I'm not able to use the new RR or RCA as it's just too demanding on my 960.  Not sure I'm missing out on anything though as my playback looks pretty good for just about everything to me.  The entire pre-process helps with 'Sharpness' setting in my display set at 21 out of 100, when it used to be 71 after calibrating without madVR.  I think that's quite an improvement out of a used card I paid $125 for.

Thank you .. I just wondered if NVIDIA would give me better colours, sharpness video playback etc etc.. Although I don't seem to have any issues with my current card but it is a cheap card .. around $40 probably.
(2017-10-30, 19:15)brazen1 Wrote: [ -> ]Can't comment on the ATI nor the differences.  If you like it, that's all that matters.  I was going to add my madVR settings to the guide but every card is different as are the profiles different folks would be interested in.  There are some relevant pictures in there related to the thread though.  Fwiw, I think FSE, D3D, Image NGU Sharp on high, Chroma NGU AA on medium and ordered dithering are of most importance and that's what I use.  I'm not able to use the new RR or RCA as it's just too demanding on my 960.  Not sure I'm missing out on anything though as my playback looks pretty good for just about everything to me.  The entire pre-process helps with 'Sharpness' setting in my display set at 21 out of 100, when it used to be 71 after calibrating without madVR.  I think that's quite an improvement out of a used card I paid $125 for.

Hi again,  what's your thoughts on a sapphire amd R9 390 8gb card? I'm able to purchase it in excellent condition for £110?or would you still reccomend the nvidia?