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Full Version: advancedsettings-cache-memorysize does not match with cache actually used
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I am wondering on how the cache settings in the advancedsettings.xml behave.
It seems, that the cache actually used is only 35% to 45% of the value set.

I use

  <cache>
    <buffermode>1</buffermode>
    <readfactor>3</readfactor>
    <memorysize>xxx</memorysize>
  </cache>

In my example, I varied the settings in  advancedsettings/cache/memorysize from 100MB/500MB/1GB/2GB/2.5GB/3GB (in Bytes of course). I got much lesser actual cache sizes from the Codec Info Overlay (keyboard shortcut ctrl+shift+o) of  36MB/179MB/428MB/889MB/1110MB/1350MB which is about 35% for the little cache sizes to 45% to the big cache sizes. The memory used by Kodi according to the gnome-system-monitor also is linear increasing with the cache set (321MB/493MB/687MB/1200MB/1400MB/1600MB). The hint in the wiki does not seem to be correct any more, that the cache uses RAM three times the cache size.

I am using Kodi 17.6 with Ubuntu 16.04 (x86_64).
Is this behavior platform-dependent, so the wiki gives rather low cache values as recommendation to make sure users don't have an unstable setting?
I have a pretty bad WiFi and stuck to the recommendation for years, but now I would set up about 6 times the value before to use up all of my 3GB of RAM. I am unsure if this could pose problems in some cases (e.g. different media sources, containers or codecs).

This was also discussed in this thread, but there the cache size seemed to have an upper limit under Windows and it was the current development version of Kodi 18
If you read further on the thread you pointed at you'll see that the upper limit was indeed the limitation of VAS on windows 32bit build, but the inaccuracy of the wiki reference regarding the cache size exists on the 64bit build also, and it also happens on Kodi 16, 17 and 18.
So, I guess it's always been like this.