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Release Control Kodi with your Google Home
Hi

I was glad to see this because i bought my Google Nest yesterday and today i was already longing for a way to control my Kodi on my meda PC with OpenElec solution.

But maybe i'm just missing something but i can't find a file to download to install this on my Kodi?

ToddeSwe
Asus s1-at5nm10e - Netgear READY NAS 102 - Wired -
-Receiver Pioneer VSX-529-K - ASUS RT-AC58U - USB HDD connected Seagate - SONY BRAVIA KDL-55W955B - Netgear ReadyNAS 102
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Google announced earlier this week that Google Play Music will end in December 2020.  YouTube Music is replacing it and the limitations are huge with YTM.  

Would this tool possibly work as a replacement?  Can I say Hey Google Kodi play Gary's playlist and would the music come out the device I am talking on (Like a Google Max)
Kodi: Shield Pro 2019
Storage: Synology DS2415+, TheCUS N5550 running DSM 6.2 via Jun's loader
HT: LG 65C9 OLED, Pioneer VSX-LX503, Pronto TSU-9400 remote
Speakers: ProAc Super Towers/front, ProAc EBT's/rear, Polk S35/center, SVS PB-2000 Subwoofer
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(2020-07-30, 22:20)ToddeSwe Wrote: Hi

I was glad to see this because i bought my Google Nest yesterday and today i was already longing for a way to control my Kodi on my meda PC with OpenElec solution.

But maybe i'm just missing something but i can't find a file to download to install this on my Kodi?

ToddeSwe
You don't. The only setting you change in Kodi is 'allow the device to be controlled via http' in services (under settings), and maybe set a password for that. (Not mandatory.)

Kodi will then run a webserver, that can be used to send commands to, to have it do stuff.

You then have to forward the port on your home router to the wider internet (so the device you are running Kodi on becomes addressable from the internet). For this it is recommended to pick a port above 10.000 and forward it to the internal port on your kodi device (f.e. 8080). Then potentially setup a DynDNS service (preferably on your router) (google DuckDNS for a popular one), which is a thingy, that would tell a service at all times what your home networks public IP address was, and then match an url, or an IP to that (in case your internet service provider doesnt provide you with a static IP address - if it does, you can skip the DynDNS step).

When you have that set up correctly, you should be able to surf to that address:port (so f.e. something.com:10080) on your smartphone (while it is using the cell network), and would have Kodi on your device respond with a website (a webportal).

Once you've done that, the rest is easy. Wink

Follow this write up: https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi...-663013407
together with the readme on https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi/ for Glitch (you basically dont use Glitch anymore, but repl.it - but the setup is similar).

What you are doing is setting up a free webserver, running OmerTus code on that server, which now acts as an intermediary between IFTTT and your Kodi box.

IFTTT.com has a service part that can interact with Google Assistant (on your google account), and can be used to set up the voice command part, IFTTT then will be set up (by you) to send specific actions, when google Home hears a HomeKodi command, to said webserver, and the webserver then sends the correct request to your kodibox (address:port), and Kodi responds. Smile

Hardest part is to get dyndns and the portforwarding to work. Smile (Requires some knowledge of your home router. Not all routers support DynDNS.)

All of this can be set up for free.
Reply
(2020-08-08, 17:58)harlekin Wrote:
(2020-07-30, 22:20)ToddeSwe Wrote: Hi

I was glad to see this because i bought my Google Nest yesterday and today i was already longing for a way to control my Kodi on my meda PC with OpenElec solution.

But maybe i'm just missing something but i can't find a file to download to install this on my Kodi?

ToddeSwe
You don't. The only setting you change in Kodi is 'allow the device to be controlled via http' in services (under settings), and maybe set a password for that. (Not mandatory.)

Kodi will then run a webserver, that can be used to send commands to, to have it do stuff.

You then have to forward the port on your home router to the wider internet (so the device you are running Kodi on becomes addressable from the internet). For this it is recommended to pick a port above 10.000 and forward it to the internal port on your kodi device (f.e. 8080). Then potentially setup a DynDNS service (preferably on your router) (google DuckDNS for a popular one), which is a thingy, that would tell a service at all time what your home networks public IP address was, and then match an url, or an IP to that (in case your internet service provider doesnt provide you with a static IP address - if it does, you can skip the DynDNS step).

When you have that set up correctly, you should be able to surf to that address:port (so f.e. something.com:10080) on your smartphone (while it is using the cell network), and would have Kodi on your device respond with a website (a webportal).

Once you've done that, the rest is easy. Wink

Follow this write up: https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi...-663013407
together with the readme on https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi/ for Glitch (you basically dont use Glitch anymore, but repl.it - but the setup is similar).

What you are doing is setting up a free webserver, running OmerTus code on that server, which now acts as an intermediary between IFTTT and your Kodi box.

IFTTT.com has a service part that can interact with Google Assistant (on your google account), and can be used to set up the voice command part, IFTTT then will be set up (by you) to send specific actions, when google Home hears a HomeKodi command, to said webserver, and the webserver then sends the correct request to your kodibox (address:port), and Kodi responds. Smile

Hardest part is to get dyndns and the portforwarding to work. Smile (Requires some knowledge of your home router. Not all routers support DynDNS.)

All of this can be set up for free.

Hi and many thanks for this superb desciption on how to. But this i will never be able to do for myself. At least i know now that i should forget to use my Kodi with my new toy Google Nest. Smile
Asus s1-at5nm10e - Netgear READY NAS 102 - Wired -
-Receiver Pioneer VSX-529-K - ASUS RT-AC58U - USB HDD connected Seagate - SONY BRAVIA KDL-55W955B - Netgear ReadyNAS 102
Reply
(2020-08-08, 17:58)harlekin Wrote:
(2020-07-30, 22:20)ToddeSwe Wrote: Hi

I was glad to see this because i bought my Google Nest yesterday and today i was already longing for a way to control my Kodi on my meda PC with OpenElec solution.

But maybe i'm just missing something but i can't find a file to download to install this on my Kodi?

ToddeSwe
You don't. The only setting you change in Kodi is 'allow the device to be controlled via http' in services (under settings), and maybe set a password for that. (Not mandatory.)

Kodi will then run a webserver, that can be used to send commands to, to have it do stuff.

You then have to forward the port on your home router to the wider internet (so the device you are running Kodi on becomes addressable from the internet). For this it is recommended to pick a port above 10.000 and forward it to the internal port on your kodi device (f.e. 8080). Then potentially setup a DynDNS service (preferably on your router) (google DuckDNS for a popular one), which is a thingy, that would tell a service at all time what your home networks public IP address was, and then match an url, or an IP to that (in case your internet service provider doesnt provide you with a static IP address - if it does, you can skip the DynDNS step).

When you have that set up correctly, you should be able to surf to that address:port (so f.e. something.com:10080) on your smartphone (while it is using the cell network), and would have Kodi on your device respond with a website (a webportal).

Once you've done that, the rest is easy. Wink

Follow this write up: https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi...-663013407
together with the readme on https://github.com/OmerTu/GoogleHomeKodi/ for Glitch (you basically dont use Glitch anymore, but repl.it - but the setup is similar).

What you are doing is setting up a free webserver, running OmerTus code on that server, which now acts as an intermediary between IFTTT and your Kodi box.

IFTTT.com has a service part that can interact with Google Assistant (on your google account), and can be used to set up the voice command part, IFTTT then will be set up (by you) to send specific actions, when google Home hears a HomeKodi command, to said webserver, and the webserver then sends the correct request to your kodibox (address:port), and Kodi responds. Smile

Hardest part is to get dyndns and the portforwarding to work. Smile (Requires some knowledge of your home router. Not all routers support DynDNS.)

All of this can be set up for free.

I'm using coreelec!
I think I did everything but forget some detail!
I'm in Brazil can I help, check my settings?
Via teamviewer!
Thank you.
Reply
That defeats the purpose of having you learning it on your own. Smile

The entire process is pretty 'easy' when it comes to troubleshooting, because you can check functionality every step of the way. Smile

Portforwarding and DDNS set up correctly? Do I get a website as a response (/password entry prompt), when I surf to address:port on my smartphone (using a browser Wink ), using the cell network (not Wifi)? If yes, that part is done correctly.

Webserver with Omertus code set up correctly? (F.e. on repl.it) Do I get any error message on repl.it in the terminal? (If yes, kodi hosts config is not set correctly, look at the images in the github thread linked above). Do I see the "test functionality page" on repl.it after pressing start? (If yes, repl.it is set up correctly.) Does the "test functionality page" communicate with my Kodi installation correctly? (If yes, you've used the correct settings to set up the repl.it server.)

After that the only part that is left is setting up IFTTT following the glitch guide in the github readme, but using the repl.it (repl.co) url (the one you see above the testpage), with a simple / command added at first (try /playpause first). Once that works, you have everything in place.


You even can try it without DynDNS (DDNS) at first, just using your public ip address (google "what is my ip" without the quotes on a PC in your home network (WLAN or LAN)), but the problem here is, that the setup would break, whenever your ISP changes your IP address (if it doesnt offer you a static one, that only changes once every three years or so). So thats what you have your DDNS service for. (So you get an url/ip thats always the same, which gets dynamically mapped to the IP your home network is addressable under all the time.)


On repl.it the only part you "invent" is the "token" (choose any word or phrase), all the other fields in settings should be self explanatory. (IP address, public port (the one above 10.000), kodi username and password (see kodi settings page), ...)
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(2020-08-10, 06:32)harlekin Wrote: That defeats the purpose of having you learning it on your own. Smile

The entire process is pretty 'easy' when it comes to troubleshooting, because you can check functionality every step of the way. Smile

Portforwarding and DDNS set up correctly? Do I get a website as a response (/password entry prompt), when I surf to address:port on my smartphone (using a browser Wink ), using the cell network (not Wifi)? If yes, that part is done correctly.

Webserver with Omertus code set up correctly? (F.e. on repl.it) Do I get any error message on repl.it in the terminal? (If yes, kodi hosts config is not set correctly, look at the images in the github thread linked above). Do I see the "test functionality page" on repl.it after pressing start? (If yes, repl.it is set up correctly.) Does the "test functionality page" communicate with my Kodi installation correctly? (If yes, you've used the correct settings to set up the repl.it server.)

After that the only part that is left is setting up IFTTT following the glitch guide in the github readme, but using the repl.it (repl.co) url (the one you see above the testpage), with a simple / command added at first (try /playpause first). Once that works, you have everything in place.


You even can try it without DynDNS (DDNS) at first, just using your public ip address (google "what is my ip" without the quotes on a PC in your home network (WLAN or LAN)), but the problem here is, that the setup would break, whenever your ISP changes your IP address (if it doesnt offer you a static one, that only changes once every three years or so). So thats what you have your DDNS service for. (So you get an url/ip thats always the same, which gets dynamically mapped to the IP your home network is addressable under all the time.)


On repl.it the only part you "invent" is the "token" (choose any word or phrase), all the other fields in settings should be self explanatory. (IP address, public port (the one above 10.000), kodi username and password (see kodi settings page), ...)

Where will I insert the token I don't see anything like that in: kodi-hosts.config.js
Thank you.
Reply
(2020-08-10, 06:48)erbas Wrote:
(2020-08-10, 06:32)harlekin Wrote: That defeats the purpose of having you learning it on your own. Smile

The entire process is pretty 'easy' when it comes to troubleshooting, because you can check functionality every step of the way. Smile

Portforwarding and DDNS set up correctly? Do I get a website as a response (/password entry prompt), when I surf to address:port on my smartphone (using a browser Wink ), using the cell network (not Wifi)? If yes, that part is done correctly.

Webserver with Omertus code set up correctly? (F.e. on repl.it) Do I get any error message on repl.it in the terminal? (If yes, kodi hosts config is not set correctly, look at the images in the github thread linked above). Do I see the "test functionality page" on repl.it after pressing start? (If yes, repl.it is set up correctly.) Does the "test functionality page" communicate with my Kodi installation correctly? (If yes, you've used the correct settings to set up the repl.it server.)

After that the only part that is left is setting up IFTTT following the glitch guide in the github readme, but using the repl.it (repl.co) url (the one you see above the testpage), with a simple / command added at first (try /playpause first). Once that works, you have everything in place.


You even can try it without DynDNS (DDNS) at first, just using your public ip address (google "what is my ip" without the quotes on a PC in your home network (WLAN or LAN)), but the problem here is, that the setup would break, whenever your ISP changes your IP address (if it doesnt offer you a static one, that only changes once every three years or so). So thats what you have your DDNS service for. (So you get an url/ip thats always the same, which gets dynamically mapped to the IP your home network is addressable under all the time.)


On repl.it the only part you "invent" is the "token" (choose any word or phrase), all the other fields in settings should be self explanatory. (IP address, public port (the one above 10.000), kodi username and password (see kodi settings page), ...)

Where will I insert the token I don't see anything like that in: kodi-hosts.config.js
Thank you.

Its also in the kodi-hosts.config.js (the only file you'll edit on repl.it) - look at the screenshots in the github thread linked (the one dealing with repl.it, scroll down a bit).

The 'token' is just something the (repl.it) server deals with, its something close in functionality to a password, so it only responds to requests that tell him that token. (IFTTT talks to the repl.it server using a post request in JSON, this post request also will have the token embedded in the body, so the server knows that its an 'authorized' request). The token is just a word you make up, and you have to put it into the kodi-hosts.config.js file on repl.it, and into the config for your IFTTT command(s) (that part (setting up IFTTT) is exactly the same as the glitch tutorial in the official Omertu readme (only thing thats different there is the beginning of the url (not glitch, but the url you get from repl.it (above the test webpage that hopefully shows up when you hit the run button - on the test page (to test those commands, on repl.it) you also need to enter the token word, but there it wont be saved, you only enter it there to test the functionality and the connection of the repl.it server to your Kodi box.)))
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@harlekin Can you tell where the error is, I have a fixed ip and port: 8080 I have access to the port on the entire network.

 npm start

> [email protected] start /home/runner/ImpureThankfulInverse
> node server.js

Loaded 1 Kodi hosts.
Loaded config from kodi-hosts.config.js, {
  "authToken": "MyToken",
  "listenerPort": "8099",
  "youtubeKey": "AIzaSyAyxxxxxxJxQoruMz1m-345S8cBo"
}
Your app is listening on port 8099
Authentication succeeded
==== BEGIN === route:  /koditestconnection
Sending command to kodi http://192.168.1.XXX:8080/jsonrpc:
{
  "jsonrpc": "2.0",
  "id": 1,
  "method": "GUI.ShowNotification",
  "params": {
    "title": "GoogleHomeKodi",
    "message": "Test Successful!",
    "image": "info"
  }
}
request failed
route:  /koditestconnection
query:  {}
error:  FetchError: request to http://192.168.1.XXX:8080/jsonrpc failed, reason: connect ETIMEDOUT 192.168.1.XXX:8080
    at ClientRequest.<anonymous> (/home/runner/ImpureThankfulInverse/node_modules/node-fetch/lib/index.js:1455:11)
    at ClientRequest.emit (events.js:315:20)
    at Socket.socketErrorListener (_http_client.js:426:9)
    at Socket.emit (events.js:315:20)
    at emitErrorNT (internal/streams/destroy.js:92:8)
    at emitErrorAndCloseNT (internal/streams/destroy.js:60:3)
    at processTicksAndRejections (internal/process/task_queues.js:84:21) {
  type: 'system',
  errno: 'ETIMEDOUT',
  code: 'ETIMEDOUT'
}
body:  { token: 'MyConnectionToken' }
versions:  {
  node: '12.18.3',
  v8: '7.8.279.23-node.39',
  uv: '1.38.0',
  zlib: '1.2.11',
  brotli: '1.0.7',
  ares: '1.16.0',
  modules: '72',
  nghttp2: '1.41.0',
  napi: '6',
  llhttp: '2.0.4',
  http_parser: '2.9.3',
  openssl: '1.1.1g',
  cldr: '37.0',
  icu: '67.1',
  tz: '2019c',
  unicode: '13.0'
}
==== END === route:  /koditestconnection
Reply
*rofl*
Quote:Sending command to kodi http://192.168.1.XXX:8080/jsonrpc

192.168.1.XXX is an internal IP adress. (Local Area Network address.)

For something on the internet to get access to your kodi box it needs the actual IP address of your home network. The thing I already wrote would come up, when you google "what is my ip". The internal address (192.168.1.XXX) is more ore less the same for every second dude/gal on the planet.

What you need to do is get your external IP address working with the port added to the end.

So far you've ignored four steps I mentioned.

1. If you get the 'website/password prompt' response surfing to ipaddress:port, on your smartphone, while connected to the CELL network, you are ok. If you get it while connected to the WLAN, well horray, you havent done so much yet.. Wink

2. You need to 'punch a hole' (portforwarding) into your routers firewall, so the Kodibox becomes accessible from the internet at large (WAN (public) IP address (Wide Area Network), the thing that comes up when you google "what is my IP"), then check with your smartphone on the CELL network, if that was successful.

3. When doing that portforwarding stuff, choose a port higher than 10.000 at random that you would open on your router, to then forward to IP address 192.168.1.XXX (XXX has to be the actual number your kodi box is in your home network under) at port 8080. Dont just open port 8080 on your public IP on your router. Reason - ports below 10.000 get more frequently scanned by attackers at random, to see if they are open. Also, if you use open default ports on the router side, it might tell an attacker what you are running behind that. So if that port is open, and you advertise to hackers, what might run behind that, and common software might have known security flaws - hacker might own your home router. Might. Still, you dont help in that effort, thats why you choose a port higher than 10.000, at random, to open on your router side. (Port in the kodi settings interface still can be 8080, you port forward the external port to the internal port at said (internal) IP address, anyhow.

4. Your 'external' (public) IP (the one you get when you google what is my ip) might change, daily, depending on your ISP. Every time it does, it would break the setup. So find out if it does - and if so, you have to look into DynDNS (f.e. duckdns) as well.
--

If you just find out, that there are such a thing as public and internal ip addresses, you have some reading up to do on "how your router/modem works.. " Wink usually people find out, once they realize that everyone uses 192.168.1.XXX in examples, and that there have to be more than 256 (XXX can only be one of 256 numbers. Wink ) devices on the internet.. Wink

You can still do it - but again, if you come at this with no prior knowledge, the 'figuring out your router, and portforwarding, and DynDNS (DDNS)' stuff is the hardest.. Smile
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(2020-08-11, 11:17)harlekin Wrote: *rofl*
Quote:Sending command to kodi http://192.168.1.XXX:8080/jsonrpc

192.168.1.XXX is an internal IP adress. (Local Area Network address.)

For something on the internet to get access to your kodi box it needs the actual IP address of your home network. The thing I already wrote would come up, when you google "what is my ip". The internal address (192.168.1.XXX) is more ore less the same for every second dude/gal on the planet.

What you need to do is get your external IP address working with the port added to the end.

So far you've ignored four steps I mentioned.

1. If you get the 'website/password prompt' response surfing to ipaddress:port, on your smartphone, while connected to the CELL network, you are ok. If you get it while connected to the WLAN, well horray, you havent done so much yet.. Wink

2. You need to 'punch a hole' (portforwarding) into your routers firewall, so the Kodibox becomes accessible from the internet at large (WAN (public) IP address (Wide Area Network), the thing that comes up when you google "what is my IP"), then check with your smartphone on the CELL network, if that was successful.

3. When doing that portforwarding stuff, choose a port higher than 10.000 at random that you would open on your router, to then forward to IP address 192.168.1.XXX (XXX has to be the actual number your kodi box is in your home network under) at port 8080. Dont just open port 8080 on your public IP on your router. Reason - ports below 10.000 get more frequently scanned by attackers at random, to see if they are open. Also, if you use open default ports on the router side, it might tell an attacker what you are running behind that. So if that port is open, and you advertise to hackers, what might run behind that, and common software might have known security flaws - hacker might own your home router. Might. Still, you dont help in that effort, thats why you choose a port higher than 10.000, at random, to open on your router side. (Port in the kodi settings interface still can be 8080, you port forward the external port to the internal port at said (internal) IP address, anyhow.

4. Your 'external' (public) IP (the one you get when you google what is my ip) might change, daily, depending on your ISP. Every time it does, it would break the setup. So find out if it does - and if so, you have to look into DynDNS (f.e. duckdns) as well.
--

If you just find out, that there are such a thing as public and internal ip addresses, you have some reading up to do on "how your router/modem works.. " Wink usually people find out, once they realize that everyone uses 192.168.1.XXX in examples, and that there have to be more than 256 (XXX can only be one of 256 numbers. Wink ) devices on the internet.. Wink

You can still do it - but again, if you come at this with no prior knowledge, the 'figuring out your router, and portforwarding, and DynDNS (DDNS)' stuff is the hardest.. Smile
thanks ️
Our routers are blocked by the internet operator!
Almost impossible to get into it.
I solved the problem by buying a broadllink rm pro.
I have many limitations for something so simple.
Thank you.
Reply
(2020-08-12, 02:09)erbas Wrote: thanks ️
Our routers are blocked by the internet operator!
Almost impossible to get into it.
I solved the problem by buying a broadllink rm pro.
I have many limitations for something so simple.
Thank you.

Internet operator (ISP) usually gives you a router/modem combo. Port forwarding may, or may not be disabled by them. (Usually they have some way of enabling it, if 'gamers' are a demographic they care about, because gamers need that. Wink )

The ISP may also change your public IP address (f.e.) once a day, because that way they can save address space (most will do that).

Almost no ISP will give you a modem/router combo that would be compatible with a DynDNS (DDNS) service.
--

Usually as long as your ISP allows you to do port forwarding - you should be good though.

The 'hardest' part comes from you maybe having to run your own router behind the ISPs modem/router, and figuring out how to set that up, so you could have DDNS if needed. And partly from having to figure out port forwarding.

As DDNS is just 'a device' announcing to a web service what your public IP is at all times, it could be done by any device in your houshold (that supports it), but usually its expected to be done at the router level (dont know the thing you bought, just saying how this works in general).

Also, buying a router that could do this doesnt have to be expensive at all. There are routers out there that can be flashed with open source firmware, and all that can - support everything you need. You can get used ones from 20USD upwards (in the west), and 'good' ones for about 50-60 USD used.

Tomato is an easy firmware for beginners. Refer to: https://reddit.com/r/TomatoFTW/ for help if you need. Smile Flashing a router with a custom firmware can brick it, so on that whole venture, and learning the basics of home networking, you are on your own. Wink Thats the hardest part (the one we cant walk you through), the rest is not so hard, you basically can do it by following a tutorial someone wrote.
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removed
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Greetings. I have Libreelec installed on a Raspberry pi 4. When I try to install GoogleHomeKodi-Master.zip I get "Failed to install due to an invalid structure". Is there a newer version, or will this not work on a Raspberry pi 4?
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Read this page. Dont treat forums as personal support service entities.
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