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Linux VAAPI: Nuc, Chromebox, HSW, IVB, Baytrail with Ubuntu 14.04
Yeah. Rc3 has it all.
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
hi guys,

what deinterlacer gives best possible image quality?
GPU VAAPI-MCDI or CPU Deinterlace/YaDif
You mean from a least square optimization measure vs losless progressive material? or concerning "subjective" impression?

In fact MCDI quality is awesome, yadif is also awesome, I don't see a real difference, but I also don't hang directly with my face infront of the TV (besides when debugging).

There is another thing relevant:

MCDI will use the "VAAPI Render Path", Yadif will use the SWFilter path. It now highly depends on if your TV is Full RGB or RGB Limited :-)

In short: Check out yourself, here are some samples: http://solidrun.maltegrosse.de/~fritsch/

Edit: And something else, _never_ set Deinterlace to "On", keep it on "Auto".
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
edit: both actually Wink

sorry my question was a bit vague...
i've got a full rgb tv (60"plasma wide color range etc etc)

1080i content i mean.
my kodi client has a dual core 3.3ghz and uses the sw deinterlace method, which is really (i mean really) good, certainly better than vdpau's temporal/spatial.
i wondered if it would get even better with hsw + vaapi-mcdi...

i will certainly check the samples!
Yes, you will. I am really impressed by MCDI, just give it a try. The chromebox is additionally fast enough to use the Yadif path.
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
(2014-12-24, 13:16)fritsch Wrote: Yeah. Rc3 has it all.

Oh - that's great news fritsch. As ever many thanks to you and the team for sorting this. The Haswell Chromebox has become a fantastic little Kodi solution for me now.

(2014-12-24, 14:38)fritsch Wrote: Edit: And something else, _never_ set Deinterlace to "On", keep it on "Auto".

(Unless you are playing 4:2:2 interlaced content, which isn't recognised as interlaced in Auto mode - or wasn't last time I checked)
(2014-12-24, 14:47)fritsch Wrote: Yes, you will. I am really impressed by MCDI, just give it a try. The chromebox is additionally fast enough to use the Yadif path.

I will try, i've got acouple of chrome boxes m004u laying around here.
just for the record.... my older intel dual core E6600 cpu's can't do MCDI right?
No. Cause it's done on the GPU, that your E6600 certainly has not.
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
(2014-12-24, 14:48)noggin Wrote:
(2014-12-24, 13:16)fritsch Wrote: Yeah. Rc3 has it all.

Oh - that's great news fritsch. As ever many thanks to you and the team for sorting this. The Haswell Chromebox has become a fantastic little Kodi solution for me now.

(2014-12-24, 14:38)fritsch Wrote: Edit: And something else, _never_ set Deinterlace to "On", keep it on "Auto".

(Unless you are playing 4:2:2 interlaced content, which isn't recognised as interlaced in Auto mode - or wasn't last time I checked)


Jep, here you can then specially enable it.
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
Thanks fritsch! i know what to do now.
I compared MCDI on my various Haswell systems (i3, i5, i7, etc.). While I agree that it looks great on pure 100% interlaced content, it does struggle with mixed progressive/interlaced content. Here in USA, most premium channels like HBO, SHO, etc. perform a soft-telecine where they use MPEG2 field repeat flags to save bandwidth. Inside the compressed stream they have mostly 24 fps data with flags indicating when to repeat fields to get back to the 29.97 rate specified in the MPEG2 sequence header. Because their soft-telecine is not perfect, the pattern is not regular and some frames are stored interlaced instead of progressive.

When you feed such data into many deinterlacers, you get visible stutter and not smooth motion compared to playing this content on original set-top-box.

To get around this problem, you need to honor those field repeat flags and convert all frames to constant 29.97 fps (this requires copying fields from previous frames when required according to the flags). When you do this, the deinterlacer will now see a hard-telecine video stream that runs at a constant frame rate. Usually this produces 100% smooth motion with most hardware deinterlacing systems.

Essentially, you need a pull-up filter in the chain to convert all interlaced content to a constant frame rate. I have no idea if there is currently a way to do this in Kodi. I only tested it inside my own development video player.

Another feature I have in my player is to pass-through interlaced content without deinterlacing at all. This way, I let my TV or external video processor handle it. In this case, you also need to apply the pull-up filter so that you're always sending a constant FPS over HDMI with the correct top/bottom fields displayed.

I wish I could add some of these features to Kodi but I'm not really a Linux expert and don't have much free time. I mostly work on game consoles and Windows.
check page 85 on this thread, at the bottom and on, they have the same issue, check it out, i dont think they found a solution to it yet

(2014-12-26, 22:39)wizziwig Wrote: I compared MCDI on my various Haswell systems (i3, i5, i7, etc.). While I agree that it looks great on pure 100% interlaced content, it does struggle with mixed progressive/interlaced content. Here in USA, most premium channels like HBO, SHO, etc. perform a soft-telecine where they use MPEG2 field repeat flags to save bandwidth. Inside the compressed stream they have mostly 24 fps data with flags indicating when to repeat fields to get back to the 29.97 rate specified in the MPEG2 sequence header. Because their soft-telecine is not perfect, the pattern is not regular and some frames are stored interlaced instead of progressive.

When you feed such data into many deinterlacers, you get visible stutter and not smooth motion compared to playing this content on original set-top-box.

To get around this problem, you need to honor those field repeat flags and convert all frames to constant 29.97 fps (this requires copying fields from previous frames when required according to the flags). When you do this, the deinterlacer will now see a hard-telecine video stream that runs at a constant frame rate. Usually this produces 100% smooth motion with most hardware deinterlacing systems.

Essentially, you need a pull-up filter in the chain to convert all interlaced content to a constant frame rate. I have no idea if there is currently a way to do this in Kodi. I only tested it inside my own development video player.

Another feature I have in my player is to pass-through interlaced content without deinterlacing at all. This way, I let my TV or external video processor handle it. In this case, you also need to apply the pull-up filter so that you're always sending a constant FPS over HDMI with the correct top/bottom fields displayed.

I wish I could add some of these features to Kodi but I'm not really a Linux expert and don't have much free time. I mostly work on game consoles and Windows.
Philips 32PFL6606D
Intel N3150 fanless + 4Gb DDR3 + SSD 64Gb + 3TB+3TB WD RED
Hama MCE remote.
Ubuntu 18.04 minimal install + KODI
(2014-12-27, 00:44)Juanjo Wrote: check page 85 on this thread, at the bottom and on, they have the same issue, check it out, i dont think they found a solution to it yet

(2014-12-26, 22:39)wizziwig Wrote: I compared MCDI on my various Haswell systems (i3, i5, i7, etc.). While I agree that it looks great on pure 100% interlaced content, it does struggle with mixed progressive/interlaced content. Here in USA, most premium channels like HBO, SHO, etc. perform a soft-telecine where they use MPEG2 field repeat flags to save bandwidth. Inside the compressed stream they have mostly 24 fps data with flags indicating when to repeat fields to get back to the 29.97 rate specified in the MPEG2 sequence header. Because their soft-telecine is not perfect, the pattern is not regular and some frames are stored interlaced instead of progressive.

When you feed such data into many deinterlacers, you get visible stutter and not smooth motion compared to playing this content on original set-top-box.

To get around this problem, you need to honor those field repeat flags and convert all frames to constant 29.97 fps (this requires copying fields from previous frames when required according to the flags). When you do this, the deinterlacer will now see a hard-telecine video stream that runs at a constant frame rate. Usually this produces 100% smooth motion with most hardware deinterlacing systems.

Essentially, you need a pull-up filter in the chain to convert all interlaced content to a constant frame rate. I have no idea if there is currently a way to do this in Kodi. I only tested it inside my own development video player.

Another feature I have in my player is to pass-through interlaced content without deinterlacing at all. This way, I let my TV or external video processor handle it. In this case, you also need to apply the pull-up filter so that you're always sending a constant FPS over HDMI with the correct top/bottom fields displayed.

I wish I could add some of these features to Kodi but I'm not really a Linux expert and don't have much free time. I mostly work on game consoles and Windows.

Not quite the same issue - our issue is that in the UK we have GOP-by-GOP flipping between 25p and 50i encoding on Freeview HD OTA and there are reports that VAAPI decoding doesn't handle it well - though software decoding is OK. No 3:2 issues.

I guess if the same encoding detects 3:2 in US encoders, removes it and sends 24p with a field-repeat flag for the decoder to enforce they could be related, particularly if they are flipping between 60i and 24p (with field-repeat flagging)?
I am still getting hangs on my Asus Chrome, with your verly laterst openelec build
dmesg;
http://sprunge.us/IDbd
kodi.log
http://sprunge.us/egAa


Symptom: Picture Freezes, audio continues. Ill revert to the first build in this particular topic.
need any other log?
Nope. I cannot do anything more. If the latest build in my ivb bridge PR via oe github does not work only Intel on their bugtracker can help.
First decide what functions / features you expect from a system. Then decide for the hardware. Don't waste your money on crap.
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