advice on controllers
#1
Hey,

I just downloaded the Openelec x86-64 release and am really liking where this is going! Next up is getting some decent controllers to have fun with. I own a NES, SNES, XBOX and PS1&2 and would like to get my controllers working with Openelec. I use an Intel NUC (Haswell i3) as HTPC.

As far as I see it, I have two options: either get USB converters for my current controllers or I can order some fake controllers that are already USB capable. The difference in costs are negligible, so that's no problem. Question is, is any of the two options more compatible with Openelec then the other? Is there any difference in getting it to work?
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#2
I guess this means either nobody knows, or it doesn't matter Smile

I've decided to buy new controllers... we'll see what the results are. Wink
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#3
I don't know for sure, controller support is still in it's infancy, but for feel and satisfactory play usb adapters are defintely the way to go. I'm sure multiple controller support and easier set up will emerge eventually. I'm currently using a wired xbox360 controller becasue it works, but noting beats playing a game with the real origional controller, not to mention the usb reproductions are much lower quality.

I'm working to set up a usb hub in my coffee table and house each of the origional controllers I care about (Sega, NES, SNES). I am hoping that eventually 2 and even 4 controler set ups are supported in XBMC.
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#4
i have a usb adapter for snes, genesis and n64 (but no controllers yet lol) when I write the new input devices api this summer I'll make sure these all work, including multiplayer support
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#5
(2014-06-17, 18:14)garbear Wrote: i have a usb adapter for snes, genesis and n64 (but no controllers yet lol) when I write the new input devices api this summer I'll make sure these all work, including multiplayer support

Awesome.
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#6
Great. Thanks for your time, garbear. Since I actually did not make a purchase yet, and seeing you're going the adapter-route yourself, I'll give that a try then. Smile

ChrisMyhre, you are probably right. I haven't had my hands on one of those cheap knock-offs yet. The originals will likely deliver a more authentic experience anyway.
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#7
Being an avid Retrogamer myself, from personal experience I find that the USB Retroports from retroUSB work best: http://www.retrousb.com/index.php?cPath=21

They are from superior quality (I own the NES and SNES ports), so check them out if you're still looking for some good adapters.
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#8
https://learn.adafruit.com/snes-ez-key-b...d/overview

If you love soldering, the adafruit bluefruit is a bluetooth "trinket" development board. and can be soldered into lots of controllers with the addition to a battery that they also are able to supply.

Hmm, a great project could also be to install one of these in an Xbox 360 controller and try to program it to identify via bluetooth as an XInput device, theoretically it should work with all Xbox 360 controller compatible programs Tongue

EDIT:
Oh that module was not re-programmable, but now I want to look into this problem as a whole Tongue
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#9
(2015-01-06, 16:22)ziggurat Wrote: https://learn.adafruit.com/snes-ez-key-b...d/overview

If you love soldering, the adafruit bluefruit is a bluetooth "trinket" development board. and can be soldered into lots of controllers with the addition to a battery that they also are able to supply.

Hmm, a great project could also be to install one of these in an Xbox 360 controller and try to program it to identify via bluetooth as an XInput device, theoretically it should work with all Xbox 360 controller compatible programs Tongue

EDIT:
Oh that module was not re-programmable, but now I want to look into this problem as a whole Tongue

Nice adafruit link, I've bought hundreds of dollars worth of electronics from adafruit and used a few tutorials there in some of my own projects.

As a hardware enthusiast, DIY hardware has been a driving force behind my new input system. Check this out: peripheral add-ons. Did you just build your own controller or media reader (à la Retrode)? With a few lines of C++, you can get Kodi to recognize virtually anything as a joystick or media reader, no drivers needed. Peripheral add-ons are 100% integrated and work just like native peripherals, so you get gesture-recognition/button mapping/configuration utilities for free.

Extending peripherals to binary add-ons has cost many tens of hours and thousands of lines of additional code, but I feel the incredible opportunities it offers is more than worth the effort.

If you want to help out, post your craziest ideas here or in the Input thead. Brainstorming with you guys has been invaluable, so I'm always open for ideas/feedback.

regards,
Garrett
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#10
I'm using two of these for N64 controllers:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002B9F...UTF8&psc=1

It works beautifully in Project64, using four controllers for Goldeneye, Super Mario Kart 64, etc.

I much prefer going with USB adapters for OEM controllers then the crappy generic USB controllers.

Eventually, I'll be getting these for Gamecube:

http://www.amazon.com/GC-Controller-Adap...be+adapter

These for SNES:

http://www.amazon.com/SNES-Controller-Ad...ES+adapter

And an Xbox 360 controller:

http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Xbox-360...ler+for+pc
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#11
First party controllers are basically always better than knockoffs. Go with the USB adapters.

I personally find that the PS3 controller is near perfect for most system though. Only Nintendo64 and Sega controllers don't map great and with Sega it works, the buttons just aren't in the same spots.
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#12
We are working on a single device that will output to just about every platform Kodi works on: http://kadevice.com/2015/01/first-ever-d...%EF%BB%BF/
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