•   
  • 1
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6(current)
  • 7
  • 8
  • 58
  •   
Google Nexus Player
#76
(2014-10-15, 20:37)scottyedmonds Wrote:
(2014-10-15, 20:02)kenelbow Wrote: I just saw that it is WiFi only. Kind of a deal breaker for me.

It supports 802.11ac 2x2 (MIMO)... It probably has Broadcom's new BCM4354 chip See HERE

Even with mediocre wifi signal, you should have no problem getting 15mbps which you'll be hard pressed to find a 1080p video with a high bitrate that exceeds that.

Eh? Lots of us watch native Blu-ray content on our XBMC/Kodi installs. These often exceed 15Mbs for 1080p. I have some stuff that peaks at over twice that bitrate.

(Be interesting to see how audio is handled on this platform - particularly DTS HD, Dolby True HD and PCM multichannel output)
Reply
#77
I have stuff with bitrate peaks around 100mbps... 'The Immortals' 3D BD, 'The Avengers' 3D BD (final battle sequence), etc.
[H]i-[d]eft [M]edia [K]een [V]ideosaurus
My Family Room Theater
Reply
#78
I think they may have meant 15MBps, which would be 120Mbps.

However, with AC to AC you should see better speeds. At least double that or better.

(2014-10-16, 22:39)BradleyR Wrote: For all of you asking, yes you can sideload XBMC/Kodi to it, the latest Helix nightly works fine on it, I use it everyday on my adt-1

But the ADT-1 is ARM and the Nexus is x86. Do you think there might be a difference given the different architecture, since you can't run Kodi Arm on x86 and vice versa?

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply
#79
(2014-10-17, 00:20)Tinwarble Wrote: But the ADT-1 is ARM and the Nexus is x86. Do you think there might be a difference given the different architecture, since you can't run Kodi Arm on x86 and vice versa?


there are already builds for Android x86 check the download page Wink
Reply
#80
(2014-10-17, 00:25)BradleyR Wrote: there are already builds for Android x86 check the download page Wink

Not what I meant. I know there are Android x86 builds, my question is in comparing Kodi (ARM) on Android TV ARM (ADT-1) vs. Kodi (x86) on Android TV x86 (Nexus).

I would assume that there are going to be differences in capabilities and limitations given the different architectures, regardless that they are running the same OS.

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply
#81
So do you have to have a AC router for the Nexus Player to even work? Or is it backwards compatible with N 2.4 GHz & 5.0 Ghz dual band?

Why would anyone buy a Ethernet adapter for it. It should just have it, how much does it really save them. FireTV has it, and it for the most part sells at the same price point, or even lower $85.
Reply
#82
Quote:It's enough to make one excited just to see what new capabilities Android TV will bring, especially running on x86.

What do you imagine? Do you think this was a smart decision on googles part? (To go with x86).
From what I've been reading, quite a few ppl are saying they're worried about app compatibility when using an x86 processor (as opposed to arm).
My band - www.myspace.com/seabasskid
My systems - MEDIASERVER: ASRock 330, 1.6GHz DualCore Atom, GeForce9400 ION, 2GB ram
STAND-ALONE: Raspberry Pi2 MODEL B, OSMC Kodi15.2 compiled: Sept 27th 2015
XboxLive Gamertag - SkillipEvolver
Reply
#83
Considering Intel are practically giving away their silicon in order to remain relevant in this space, it's probably a bit of a no-brainer for Google.
Texture Cache Maintenance Utility: Preload your texture cache for optimal UI performance. Remotely manage media libraries. Purge unused artwork to free up space. Find missing media. Configurable QA check to highlight metadata issues. Aid in diagnosis of library and cache related problems.
Reply
#84
(2014-10-17, 01:24)PantsOnFire Wrote:
Quote:It's enough to make one excited just to see what new capabilities Android TV will bring, especially running on x86.

What do you imagine? Do you think this was a smart decision on googles part? (To go with x86).
From what I've been reading, quite a few ppl are saying they're worried about app compatibility when using an x86 processor (as opposed to arm).

Wasn't the original Google TV devices x86? And some of the criticism levelled at it was that many android apps weren't compatible
Reply
#85
Google has come a long way in improving x86 Android support, as well as making it easier to make applications that work on both processor types. The number of TV-friendly apps is also a much smaller chunk of Android, so I doubt it will be a major issue for most users.
Reply
#86
(2014-10-17, 00:43)BigB42078 Wrote: So do you have to have a AC router for the Nexus Player to even work? Or is it backwards compatible with N 2.4 GHz & 5.0 Ghz dual band?

Don't know, seems that it will be 5GHz only, but may be mixed a+n+ac. Nobody may truly know until it's actually launched.

If they are using the BCM4345 as someone mentioned in a previous post, there's just no information about it being backwards compatible.

(2014-10-17, 01:24)PantsOnFire Wrote: What do you imagine? Do you think this was a smart decision on googles part? (To go with x86).
From what I've been reading, quite a few ppl are saying they're worried about app compatibility when using an x86 processor (as opposed to arm).

Don't know whether it was a good decision or not, only time will tell. But it does open up possibilities and not knowing shouldn't curb anyone from being excited just to see what it might bring to the table.

You can after all be excited to see what happens with a device, without having to make any commitment to that device.

(2014-10-17, 03:43)Vidman Wrote: Wasn't the original Google TV devices x86? And some of the criticism levelled at it was that many android apps weren't compatible

No, criticism was due Google TV, which was a failed project that even Google has more or less admitted too. That is why Google TV has been dumped and were now see Android TV, which is more like Android for your TV rather than just an updated Google TV.

And at the time the Revue (which was the first Google TV device launch) which was x86, there just weren't many "TV" apps available. That's not so much the case now, especially with the popularity of the Fire TV more and more apps are getting the "TV Friendly" touch.

Compatibility will still be an issue as apps will still have to be built for Android TV, since just like with the Fire TV you can't just use standard Android apps. They have to be remote/game pad compatible and made for the big screen.

Whether there will be a issue between ARM and x86 apps, I don't know. But I would expect that Google will push app developers to have their apps compatible with both ARM and x86 if they are going to publish Android TV apps in the Play Store. That, or there's already something within the SDK that makes apps compatible for both.

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply
#87
I hope we'll be seeing some x86 builds for Intel Core i3/i5 hardware. XBMC + Chromecast capabilities in one package? Sign me up!
Reply
#88
There are already x86 builds available for many months
Read/follow the forum rules.
For troubleshooting and bug reporting, read this first
Interested in seeing some YouTube videos about Kodi? Go here and subscribe
Reply
#89
(2014-10-16, 22:39)BradleyR Wrote: For all of you asking, yes you can sideload XBMC/Kodi to it, the latest Helix nightly works fine on it, I use it everyday on my adt-1

Just as important, does a sideloaded app appear on the normal app screen or do you have to go digging for it?
Reply
#90
I'm willing to bet it appears on the regular screen. Android has never made a distinction between Play-installed apps and sideloads in the past, I don't see why they would start now. It's not added complexity to users since most don't sideload anything anyway.
Reply
  •   
  • 1
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6(current)
  • 7
  • 8
  • 58
  •   



Logout Mark Read Team Forum Stats Members Help
Google Nexus Player7
This forum uses Lukasz Tkacz MyBB addons.