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Windows - HOW TO - Fix Loss of HDMI Audio After Resume from Sleep Using an EDID Override
#1
Have you lost HDMI audio after resuming from Sleep?

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Read on for the fix...

Disclaimer: This guide is considered an advanced tutorial for those comfortable with behind-the-scenes adjustment of Windows including the use of hidden boot menus, Command Prompt entries and Windows Test Mode.

While the instructions are simple and intuitive, those who do not know what a driver is or how these features are installed in Windows should best leave this tutorial alone. Possible complications include improper installation of drivers requiring uninstallation and temporary loss of video.


This tutorial is to address the loss of sound caused by the disconnection of an audio device after Windows resumes from Sleep. This commonly occurs when display and audio devices are connected via HDMI to a PC. Although the device is connected, Windows believes it has been turned off and sound is cut-off. A reboot of Windows will fix this issue in most cases, but this is not a permanent solution. This happens most often when Windows is put to Sleep rather than powered off completely.

The solution to lost audio devices involves providing Windows with on-demand access to the EDID information required to communicate with HDMI-connected devices. Windows requires the EDID - Extended Display Identification Data - from a device to conform to HDCP - High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection - to eliminate the possibility of digital data manipulation midstream between the source to the display. Without the EDID, the device does not exist. For some reason, resuming from Sleep mode often breaks the handshake between PC and display. HDCP intervenes, and sound is disabled.

An EDID override replaces the HDMI handshake by giving the display device a permanent identity — and thereby, a permanent connection to the PC. The device no longer has to "check-in" when Windows resumes from sleep and maintains its full functionality as if its normal EDID is present.

Creating an EDID override is as simple as creating an INF file with the relevant display info and loading it as a new driver in Windows. This file can be created automatically by a program called MonInfo.

How to Create and Install an EDID Override:
  1. Download and install MonInfo;
  2. Use MonInfo to Generate EDID INF for Connected Devices;
  3. Disable Required Driver Digital Signatures (aka Test Mode);
  4. Install EDID INF as a New Driver;
  5. Disable Windows Test Mode.
1. DOWNLOAD AND INSTALL MONINFO

MonInfo is capable of generating EDID files for connected devices through the creation of a custom .INF - Windows Setup Information file. This is a text-based file suitable for manual driver updates.

Install MonInfo Monitor Asset Manager: http://www.entechtaiwan.com/util/moninfo.shtm.

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2. USE MONINFO TO GENERATE EDID INF FOR CONNECTED DEVICES

Before generating the INF, ensure the audio device is connected and working. The display should be set to the correct resolution and desktop frame rate, and multi-channel audio should be configured in Windows and work correctly for all channels.

From the Windows Control Panel, select Hardware and Sound -> Sound.

The primary audio device should be displayed with a green checkmark to denote it is active.

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Open Monitor Asset Manager. The program should be run as an administrator to ensure a complete EDID is scanned. Right-click on the program or .exe and select Run as Administrator.

The program will load the relevant EDID data for devices connected to the HDMI output. This could include a television and AV receiver. The two devices will be combined into one EDID.

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Select File -> Create INF...

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Save the INF to its own folder in any directory. This INF will be used as the new display driver.

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MonInfo makes EDID INF creation that easy!
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#2
3. DISABLE REQUIRED DRIVER DIGITAL SIGNATURES (aka TEST MODE)

Before installing the INF created by MonInfo, we must disable some security put in place by Microsoft to circumvent malicious driver installation. This step is only necessary if using Windows 8 or Windows 10.

If you attempt to install a new driver for the display device using Update Driver and selecting the INF, the following message will appear:

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We will get around this by turning off driver digital signatures in Windows.

Turn Off Driver Signature Enforcement by Entering Advanced Startup Options:
  1. Type cmd in the Start Menu;
  2. Open Command Prompt;
  3. Type or copy and paste (note the spaces): shutdown /r /o /f /t 00;
  4. Hit Enter;
  5. Select Troubleshoot from the Choose an option screen;
  6. Select Advanced options from the Troubleshoot screen;
  7. Then choose Startup Settings from the Advanced options screen;
  8. Click Restart;
  9. System will restart to an Advanced Boot Options screen;
  10. Choose Option #7, Disable driver signature enforcement;
  11. Windows will boot into Test Mode.
Advanced Startup Options:

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4. INSTALL EDID INF AS A NEW DRIVER

With driver digital signatures out of the way, we will install the INF as a new display driver.

Right-click, and select Display settings.

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Scroll down, and select Advanced display settings.

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Scroll down, and select Display adapter properties. A new window will pop-up.

Choose the Monitor tab, and click Properties.

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Choose the Driver tab, and click Update Driver...

Note: Uninstallation of any drivers or EDID override is possible from the Driver tab.

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Choose Browse my computer for driver software.

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Choose Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.

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Click Have Disk...

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Select the MonInfo INF for your display. Ensure the INF is the only file in its folder or directory.

Click OK.

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A warning will appear. Select Install this driver software anyway.

The INF driver is installed.

Your device name should appear with the extension EDID Override.

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Returning to the Driver tab, MonInfo is listed as the driver provider. This implies the device is now perpetually connected under the credentials provided by the Monitor Asset Manager.

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If your screen didn't go blank, you are probably on your way...
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#3
5. DISABLE WINDOWS TEST MODE

By now, everything should be working as it was before with the new driver...well, except for one thing.

You may notice a watermark in the bottom-right corner of the desktop.

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Windows is still in Test Mode. So we will need to sign-off from Test Mode.

Open Command Prompt. I would recommend using the method shown below to ensure administrator privileges are given:
  1. Type cmd into the Start Menu;
  2. Right-click on Command Prompt, and select Open file location;
  3. Right-click on the Command Prompt shortcut, and select Run as administrator.

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In Command Prompt:

Type or copy and paste: bcdedit.exe -set TESTSIGNING OFF

Hit Enter. A message should indicate the command has been executed successfully.

Restart Windows.

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The Test Mode watermark should be removed.

After reboot, return to the Display adapter properties window and ensure the EDID Override is still in place. Test that all display refresh rates and audio output modes work as they did with the original driver.

If any problems are encountered, the INF can be uninstalled from Properties -> Driver -> Roll Back Driver.

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That's it! Nod

(Hopefully) you can enjoy the comfort of trouble-free audio with no drop-outs provided by an EDID override Cool.
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#4
6. THE HDMI PIN 19 TRICK

I'm not sure if this is urban legend or real science, but an alternative way to address lost audio devices is by modifying the end of your HDMI cable. Pin 19 is the Hot Plug Detect — the plug that monitors when devices are powered on or off, or when they are connected or disconnected. By blocking this pin with electrical tape, you may be able to keep your devices alive in all power states.

Background: Inside an HDMI cable

If you are more electrician than computer scientist, this poster may be of greater help (Note: This method is untested):

Blocking HDMI Hot Plug Detection (aka Pin 19)
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#5
Bump as guide is finished...
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#6
(2015-12-13, 07:02)Warner306 Wrote: 6. THE HDMI PIN 19 TRICK

I'm not sure if this is urban legend or real science, but an alternative way to address lost audio devices is by modifying the end of your HDMI cable. Pin 19 is the Hot Plug Detect — the plug that monitors when devices are powered on or off, or when they are connected or disconnected. By blocking this pin with electrical tape, you may be able to keep your devices alive in all power states.

Background: Inside an HDMI cable

If you are more electrician than computer scientist, this poster may be of greater help (Note: This method is untested):

Blocking HDMI Hot Plug Detection (aka Pin 19)

I believe this works i asked a work colleague and he says its a goer and he knows his 5h1t when it comes to any type of wiring or such like but do it at your own risk.

Great guide btw i used to have this problem in previous builds but it seems to have fixed its self.
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#7
PS should sticky this no?
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#8
I can move this to the "Tips, tricks, and step by step guides" forum if the OP wants.
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#9
(2015-12-14, 16:48)jjd-uk Wrote: I can move this to the "Tips, tricks, and step by step guides" forum if the OP wants.

That would be great. I'll send you a PM when ready. I wanted to add one more image and keep it in the Windows forum until it is pushed back a page or two.
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#10
I have a constant EDID issue, my maximum of supported channels is 2. I do see the same problem in MonInfo. The HDMI chain looks like this HTPC -> AVR -> Projector / TV. My AVR is acting like a switch so the EDID exchange is between the HTPC and Projector/TV.

Can I use this guide to override the that EDID info as well? The problem as I see it would be the section where you capture the MonInfo INF file since my file will never show correct info? Rolleyes
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#11
(2016-06-07, 09:18)smurfitsi Wrote: I have a constant EDID issue, my maximum of supported channels is 2. I do see the same problem in MonInfo. The HDMI chain looks like this HTPC -> AVR -> Projector / TV. My AVR is acting like a switch so the EDID exchange is between the HTPC and Projector/TV.

Can I use this guide to override the that EDID info as well? The problem as I see it would be the section where you capture the MonInfo INF file since my file will never show correct info? Rolleyes

I don't know. You could try installing the EDID and roll-back if there is no improvement.

Have you run the Windows speaker set up and chose the AV receiver as the audio device in Kodi?

Audio set up is covered here: http://forum.kodi.tv/showthread.php?tid=...pid1843523.

Set your audio device to WASAPI exclusive in Kodi so the Windows mixer doesn't downconvert.
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#12
I get a problem with the video scaling back to not filling the screen when I change HDMI sources. Do you think this would also fix this issue as I believe it is related to the loss of an active HDMI connection.
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#13
(2016-07-25, 08:16)ajerazzor Wrote: I get a problem with the video scaling back to not filling the screen when I change HDMI sources. Do you think this would also fix this issue as I believe it is related to the loss of an active HDMI connection.

Most likely, an EDID override could help. You can always uninstall it.
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#14
This is a very good tutorial, it helped me resolve problems with 2 of my PC.One had no HDMI audio after coming back from sleep, and the other one was connected to my Yamaha amplifier and windows was only detecting the tv connected. Thanx a lot.It's very important to NOT connect anything to the receiver output so when you remotely access the pc, you can extract the right driver. Once the driver extracted you connect the TV to the receiver output and do the override.
I can now get 5.1 and DTS correctly.
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#15
get a aten edid emulator. I was able to buy one off of ebay for $50 dollars and it solved all of my HDMI resume/resolution issues
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HOW TO - Fix Loss of HDMI Audio After Resume from Sleep Using an EDID Override52