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START HERE - Pick the Right Kodi Box (updated Nov. 2018)
(2018-12-08, 16:26)noggin Wrote:
(2018-12-08, 16:11)clarkss12 Wrote: Where do people get there 4k videos, in a **mobile** formatHuh  I was able to acquire an HEVC encoded movie a couple of weeks ago, through a not so reputable source to do some testing, will delete it when I get done testing.

From my results, only my Nvidia Shield and Zidoo X9S, and some of my **cheap Chinese** boxes running LibreELEC or CoreELEC could play that video.  Even my moderately powered Windows 10, desktop computer could not play that movie.  I do not have a 4k firestick to test.

To be noted, I have tested numerous 4k clips, and most of those clips play on most of my devices, but this REAL movie will NOT play on those devices.

Information from the Mediainfo Windows app.

Video
ID                                       : 1
Format                                   : HEVC
Format/Info                              : High Efficiency Video Coding
Commercial name                          : HDR10
Format profile                           : Main [email protected]@high
Codec ID                                 : V_MPEGH/ISO/HEVC
Duration                                 : 1 h 42 min
Bit rate                                 : 69.1 Mb/s
Width                                    : 3 840 pixels
Height                                   : 2 160 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0 (Type 2)
Bit depth                                : 10 bits
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.348
Stream size                              : 49.5 GiB (95%)
 A lot of early 4K content was 4K h.264 8-bit and 4K h.264 8-bit content will play on Intels from around Haswell onwards, as these devices had h.264 hardware acceleration that was good enough to play this.

However - real world UHD Blu-ray movies (which can now be ripped) are in 10-bit HEVC/h.265 and usually also in HDR10 format.  This is much more demanding to play - so needs a more recent playback solution - and you also have to factor in the complication of HDR output or HDR->SDR conversion. You will also see that UHD Blu-ray lossless rips can often have very high bitrates - which will also stress network connectivity if you are streaming them from a NAS or similar.

What do you mean by **mobile** format?  A format for playing on mobile phones - or something with smaller file sizes and lower bit rate (and thus lower quality)?  
 I did not know what word to use instead of **mobile**.  I mean a ripped copy of a 4k movie that can be used with a storage device and not a Blue-Ray player.  I am really behind the media cure.  I am still slowly converting my DVD rips to BlueRay rips.  I just purchased the ** Back to the Future ** series on Blue-Ray and ripped them.  I am trying different methods to convert those rips to .h264 or HEVC, natively, they are encoded with VC-1.

Video
ID                                       : 1
ID in the original source medium         : 4113 (0x1011)
Format                                   : VC-1
Format profile                           : [email protected]
Codec ID                                 : V_MS/VFW/FOURCC / WVC1
Codec ID/Hint                            : Microsoft
Duration                                 : 1 h 56 min
Bit rate                                 : 26.9 Mb/s
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
Bit depth                                : 8 bits
Scan type                                : Progressive
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.541
Stream size                              : 21.8 GiB (81%)
Language                                 : English
Default                                  : No
Forced                                   : No
Original source medium                   : Blu-ray
Reply
thanks for reply noggin, ill probally order vero 4k+ later then unless you or anyone has better suggestion. thanks
NUC5I5RYH
yamaha RX-V777
BenQ w1070
samsung ue55nu7100

Reply
(2018-12-08, 17:26)clarkss12 Wrote:
(2018-12-08, 16:26)noggin Wrote:
(2018-12-08, 16:11)clarkss12 Wrote: Where do people get there 4k videos, in a **mobile** formatHuh  I was able to acquire an HEVC encoded movie a couple of weeks ago, through a not so reputable source to do some testing, will delete it when I get done testing.

From my results, only my Nvidia Shield and Zidoo X9S, and some of my **cheap Chinese** boxes running LibreELEC or CoreELEC could play that video.  Even my moderately powered Windows 10, desktop computer could not play that movie.  I do not have a 4k firestick to test.

To be noted, I have tested numerous 4k clips, and most of those clips play on most of my devices, but this REAL movie will NOT play on those devices.

Information from the Mediainfo Windows app.

Video
ID                                       : 1
Format                                   : HEVC
Format/Info                              : High Efficiency Video Coding
Commercial name                          : HDR10
Format profile                           : Main [email protected]@high
Codec ID                                 : V_MPEGH/ISO/HEVC
Duration                                 : 1 h 42 min
Bit rate                                 : 69.1 Mb/s
Width                                    : 3 840 pixels
Height                                   : 2 160 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0 (Type 2)
Bit depth                                : 10 bits
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.348
Stream size                              : 49.5 GiB (95%)
 A lot of early 4K content was 4K h.264 8-bit and 4K h.264 8-bit content will play on Intels from around Haswell onwards, as these devices had h.264 hardware acceleration that was good enough to play this.

However - real world UHD Blu-ray movies (which can now be ripped) are in 10-bit HEVC/h.265 and usually also in HDR10 format.  This is much more demanding to play - so needs a more recent playback solution - and you also have to factor in the complication of HDR output or HDR->SDR conversion. You will also see that UHD Blu-ray lossless rips can often have very high bitrates - which will also stress network connectivity if you are streaming them from a NAS or similar.

What do you mean by **mobile** format?  A format for playing on mobile phones - or something with smaller file sizes and lower bit rate (and thus lower quality)?     
 I did not know what word to use instead of **mobile**.  I mean a ripped copy of a 4k movie that can be used with a storage device and not a Blue-Ray player.  I am really behind the media cure.  I am still slowly converting my DVD rips to BlueRay rips.  I just purchased the ** Back to the Future ** series on Blue-Ray and ripped them.  I am trying different methods to convert those rips to .h264 or HEVC, natively, they are encoded with VC-1.

Video
ID                                       : 1
ID in the original source medium         : 4113 (0x1011)
Format                                   : VC-1
Format profile                           : [email protected]
Codec ID                                 : V_MS/VFW/FOURCC / WVC1
Codec ID/Hint                            : Microsoft
Duration                                 : 1 h 56 min
Bit rate                                 : 26.9 Mb/s
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
Bit depth                                : 8 bits
Scan type                                : Progressive
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.541
Stream size                              : 21.8 GiB (81%)
Language                                 : English
Default                                  : No
Forced                                   : No
Original source medium                   : Blu-ray   
  
If you have the storage capacity - why not leave them as is? (That said some platforms have issues with high bitrate VC-1 content)

After ripping all my CDs to 192k MP3 back in the day, and then re-ripping them lossless a few years later, I'm now very much of the view that if at all possible it's a good idea to rip DVDs, Blu-rays and UHD Blu-rays losslessly. If there are extras you don't mind not having (and are happy to go back to the discs for) then just ripping the movie can save you a useful amount of space.

There are a number of modern, relatively low cost, Kodi platforms that can playback lossless UHD Blu-ray rips now (such as a number of AMLogic platforms, the nVidia Shield TV etc.)
Reply
(2018-12-08, 17:59)noggin Wrote:
(2018-12-08, 17:26)clarkss12 Wrote:
(2018-12-08, 16:26)noggin Wrote:  A lot of early 4K content was 4K h.264 8-bit and 4K h.264 8-bit content will play on Intels from around Haswell onwards, as these devices had h.264 hardware acceleration that was good enough to play this.

However - real world UHD Blu-ray movies (which can now be ripped) are in 10-bit HEVC/h.265 and usually also in HDR10 format.  This is much more demanding to play - so needs a more recent playback solution - and you also have to factor in the complication of HDR output or HDR->SDR conversion. You will also see that UHD Blu-ray lossless rips can often have very high bitrates - which will also stress network connectivity if you are streaming them from a NAS or similar.

What do you mean by **mobile** format?  A format for playing on mobile phones - or something with smaller file sizes and lower bit rate (and thus lower quality)?     
 I did not know what word to use instead of **mobile**.  I mean a ripped copy of a 4k movie that can be used with a storage device and not a Blue-Ray player.  I am really behind the media cure.  I am still slowly converting my DVD rips to BlueRay rips.  I just purchased the ** Back to the Future ** series on Blue-Ray and ripped them.  I am trying different methods to convert those rips to .h264 or HEVC, natively, they are encoded with VC-1.

Video
ID                                       : 1
ID in the original source medium         : 4113 (0x1011)
Format                                   : VC-1
Format profile                           : [email protected]
Codec ID                                 : V_MS/VFW/FOURCC / WVC1
Codec ID/Hint                            : Microsoft
Duration                                 : 1 h 56 min
Bit rate                                 : 26.9 Mb/s
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
Bit depth                                : 8 bits
Scan type                                : Progressive
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.541
Stream size                              : 21.8 GiB (81%)
Language                                 : English
Default                                  : No
Forced                                   : No
Original source medium                   : Blu-ray     
  
If you have the storage capacity - why not leave them as is? (That said some platforms have issues with high bitrate VC-1 content)

After ripping all my CDs to 192k MP3 back in the day, and then re-ripping them lossless a few years later, I'm now very much of the view that if at all possible it's a good idea to rip DVDs, Blu-rays and UHD Blu-rays losslessly. If there are extras you don't mind not having (and are happy to go back to the discs for) then just ripping the movie can save you a useful amount of space.

There are a number of modern, relatively low cost, Kodi platforms that can playback lossless UHD Blu-ray rips now (such as a number of AMLogic platforms, the nVidia Shield TV etc.)  
You are probably correct about leaving the rips as they are, instead of trying to change the codec to something else.  I have been trying different converter apps and not very successful at it.  Right now, I am trying to convert that "Back to the Future" movie to an HEVC codec using Handbrake, but it takes over 9 hours.  I will see what the results look like.  If I screw up, I can always re-rip the movie. 

And yes, that VC-1 codec plays havoc with some (most) of my Android boxes.
Reply
clarkss12 dateline=' Wrote: And yes, that VC-1 codec plays havoc with some (most) of my Android boxes.

Have a read of THIS thread and you will understand why.

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