nVidia Shield and 25Hz movies
#1
I must have done something wrong but I can't figure out what it is. I have three TV's each with nVidia Shield and running SPMC. I have a TV show recorded in 25Hz and it plays fine on my machine on my 8 year old Samsung 7100 TV. I also have a 9 year old Sony XBR KDL-52XBR6 52-Inch 1080p 120Hz and there is lots of stuttering/judder, whatever you call it. Same thing on my 70" Sharp LC-70LE845U. Any ideas what I'm setting wrong?

On the Sharp I have tried all the 'motion flow' options, currently on 120Hz, (no change if I turn it off). Same on the Sony. On the Shield in SPMC/Kodi I have it set to "Adjust Display Refresh Rate" - ALWAYS. "Sync Playback to Display" - OFF. "Pause on refresh rage change" - OFF.

So why does it look nice and smooth on the Samsung and really crappy on the Sony and Sharp? Am I forgetting some setting? The Shield is supposed to do 25fps just fine. Could it be the TVs not being set right? Am I missing a setting in Kodi/SPMC? I've tried everything I could think of.

Any help would be appreciated (there was nothing in the log).

Thanks.
Reply
#2
(2016-05-25, 00:17)deaded Wrote: The Shield is supposed to do 25fps just fine.
Is it? I'm not sure about that, I read posts suggesting there were issues.

I tried different settings and also have occasional stuttering with 25fp. It's better with last SPMC versions though. Using these, Kodi 25fps test files play fine, either having hardware acceleration on or off. (Standard Kodi results in constant stuttering, I think.). I have always passthrough enabled, by the way, if that may be relevant.

Any more knowledgeable info would be much appreciated.
Reply
#3
I even tried downloaded an app called TVHZ which lets you manually set the refresh rate on the android but it did not give me a 25Hz or 50Hz option.
Reply
#4
You post no debug log (wiki)s so how do you expect help?
If I have helped you or increased your knowledge, click the 'thumbs up' button to give thanks :) (People with less than 20 posts won't see the "thumbs up" button.)
Reply
#5
You'd expect the Shield to go to 50Hz output with 25Hz movies IF the display supported 50Hz display modes (Universal for TVs in Europe, less common in North America), with possibly 2160/25p for UHD output modes if the display doesn't' support 2160/50p?
Reply
#6
You would
Reply
#7
If TVHZ doesn't give you an option for 50Hz, then either your TV doesn't support it or the Shield is not properly reading the EDID of your TV.

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply
#8
That's what I figured Tinwarble. I've been trying to figure out why. Newer TVs should support it. Crap.
Reply
#9
(2016-05-28, 01:00)deaded Wrote: That's what I figured Tinwarble. I've been trying to figure out why. Newer TVs should support it. Crap.

No guarantee that new TVs sold in North America will. It's unusual for major brands (Sony, Panasonic etc.) sold in the US to include 50Hz compatibility, though no-name brands, and some of the less 'premium' models often do (as they use similar designs globally - whereas the higher-end brands often have very US-specific models)

I worked in the US making a couple of TV shows live into Europe. We had to use 50Hz in-vision displays as we were running our cameras and truck 50Hz. I took a 50Hz media player with me to test some displays in a Walmart. Finding 50Hz compatibility was tricky. The cheap no-name display in my hotel room - that worked fine...
Reply
#10
As noggin said, if you're in the US, then it's not that common. Mines a fairly new-ish Sharp 1080 TV and only supports:

Code:
(132-143)       Video Data Block

                        1920x1080p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 29.97/30Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 23.97/24Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080i @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1280x720p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1) [Native]
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (16:9, 32:27)
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (4:3, 8:9)
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (4:3, 4:9 or 8:9³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (4:3, 2:9, 4:9, or 8:9´ )
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (16:9, 16:27 or 32:27³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (16:9, 8:27, 16:27, or 32:27´ )

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply
#11
Yeah, thanks guys. Very interesting. Frustrating too.

OK. I'll wrap my head around that and take a deep breath.
Reply
#12
(2016-05-28, 03:40)deaded Wrote: Yeah, thanks guys. Very interesting. Frustrating too.

OK. I'll wrap my head around that and take a deep breath.

I don't know if Kodi offers a PAL-slowdown mode - which would take 25p and output it at 24p. That could happen if you enable "Sync Playback To Display" and have a 24p output mode as an option? I don't know if nVidia Shield Android builds have this as an option as I don't have a Shield.

I, personally, can't watch 3:2 pulled down video for any length of time. I find it really unpleasant. I have a bedroom TV which only supports 50 and 59.94/60Hz display modes so I watch 23.976p content at 25Hz (I live with the 4% speed-up as a lesser evil) with 'Sync Playback to Display' enabled.
Reply
#13
(2016-05-28, 01:25)Tinwarble Wrote: As noggin said, if you're in the US, then it's not that common. Mines a fairly new-ish Sharp 1080 TV and only supports:

Code:
(132-143)       Video Data Block

                        1920x1080p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 29.97/30Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 23.97/24Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080i @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1280x720p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1) [Native]
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (16:9, 32:27)
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (4:3, 8:9)
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (4:3, 4:9 or 8:9³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (4:3, 2:9, 4:9, or 8:9´ )
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (16:9, 16:27 or 32:27³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (16:9, 8:27, 16:27, or 32:27´ )

I've actually found that a tremendous amount of TVs in North America actually support a wide range of refresh rates, including 24, 25, 48, 50 and 60hz. Their EDIDs won't report support but if you force them a signal at that refresh rate, they'll switch to that. This makes sense since the panels and 99% of the components of a TV are mass produced and identical, regardless of where they are sold, they just have different firmware and power supplies.
Reply
#14
(2016-05-28, 14:51)DJ_Izumi Wrote:
(2016-05-28, 01:25)Tinwarble Wrote: As noggin said, if you're in the US, then it's not that common. Mines a fairly new-ish Sharp 1080 TV and only supports:

Code:
(132-143)       Video Data Block

                        1920x1080p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 29.97/30Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080p @ 23.97/24Hz - HDTV(16:9, 1:1)
                        1920x1080i @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
                        1280x720p @ 59.94/60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1) [Native]
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (16:9, 32:27)
                        720x480p @ 59.94/60Hz - EDTV (4:3, 8:9)
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (4:3, 4:9 or 8:9³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (4:3, 2:9, 4:9, or 8:9´ )
                        1440x480p @ 59.94/60Hz (16:9, 16:27 or 32:27³ )
                        2880x480p @ 59.94Hz/60Hz (16:9, 8:27, 16:27, or 32:27´ )

I've actually found that a tremendous amount of TVs in North America actually support a wide range of refresh rates, including 24, 25, 48, 50 and 60hz. Their EDIDs won't report support but if you force them a signal at that refresh rate, they'll switch to that. This makes sense since the panels and 99% of the components of a TV are mass produced and identical, regardless of where they are sold, they just have different firmware and power supplies.

Yes - though that's not much help if you are trying to play a 1080/50i Blu-ray on a normal player and TV, or using equipment you can't override the EDID of.
Reply
#15
(2016-05-28, 14:51)DJ_Izumi Wrote: I've actually found that a tremendous amount of TVs in North America actually support a wide range of refresh rates, including 24, 25, 48, 50 and 60hz. Their EDIDs won't report support but if you force them a signal at that refresh rate, they'll switch to that. This makes sense since the panels and 99% of the components of a TV are mass produced and identical, regardless of where they are sold, they just have different firmware and power supplies.

While that's true, since it's not a hardware limitation, there's a difference between what a device is capable of and what it supports. And you can't, under normal conditions, force unsupported refresh rates.

Forum Rules (wiki) | Banned add-ons (wiki) | Wiki (wiki) | Quick start guide (wiki)
Reply



Logout Mark Read Team Forum Stats Members Help
nVidia Shield and 25Hz movies0
This forum uses Lukasz Tkacz MyBB addons.