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Raspberry Pi 4
#16
> The H.265 / HEVC decoder is a HEVCv2 Main 4:4:4 10 design supporting bitstreams up to profile 5.1. Maximum picture size is 4096 x 4096.

> The VideoCore 6 is about 4 times faster than the Video Core 4.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1560/1...y_Pi_4.pdf

Well shit, what's the point of buying any other Kodi box now?

The catches are: Need a stupid hdmi dongle. Can't decode 4k h.264.
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#17
(2019-06-24, 11:05)RockerC Wrote:
(2019-06-24, 10:16)noggin Wrote: Looks like 1080p support (including HEVC/h.265 hardware decode) with audio the same as the Pi 3B+ is currently supported - with ongoing work to support 4K, HDR and HD Audio passthrough.
Does the Raspberry Pi 3+ and/or Raspberry Pi 4 have the drivers and hardware to decode and output HDR10 Media Profile (10-bit High-Dynamic-Range color) in HEVC encoded video at any resolution at all?

Not asking for 4K HDR10 video, but even just 1080p HDR10 video?     
LibreElec guys are saying that the Pi 4B will support static metadata HDR standards that are 'open' standards like HDR10 and HLG, but not licensable codecs like Dolby Vision that could require a licensing charge.  I would expect this to be the case (it just means you can write the correct InfoFrames into the HDMI stream)  Support for this may not be there now, but - along with HD Audio passthrough, USB boot etc. - it's on the to-do list.

On board HEVC/h.265 decode is 4K60 capable and without overclocking the GPU you can run 4K60 from one HDMI port, or 2 x 4K30 from two HDMI ports (*).  With GPU overclocking 2 x 4K60 outputs are available but with caveats that it may run out of display scalers(?) and corrupt in some desktop situations?

At the moment I think 1080p60 output is standard and you may have to tweak config.txt to enable experimental 4K output.  

Also hidden away is that MPEG2 is now software decode only - with 4K60 HEVC/h.265 hardware decoded.  I've seen references to 1080p60 AVC/h.264 hardware decoding, but also seen reports that 'MPEG4' is now software decoded. (As MPEG4 isn't a particularly helpful codec description I don't know quite what that means)

** EDIT - https://twitter.com/ghalfacree/status/11...06208?s=20 confirms h.264 hardware decode for 1080p60 and below.  The references to MPEG4 being software decode are the older h.263 MPEG4 part 2 flavours, not the h.264 MPEG4 part 10 flavours.  Using MPEG4 as short hand for h.264 is never helpful... **

** EDIT 2 - looks like VC-1 hardware decoding - which required a licence key - has also been deprecated.  I guess that VC-1 and MPEG2 software decoding and deinterlacing, if required, is now feasible for 1080i and 1080p content with the new faster SoC **

The great thing about the Pi SBCs has been their amazing support, and the quality of the surrounding ecosystem.  The Pi 4B may not have the best performance in all respects (not having eMMC options will disappoint some) but it will have best-in-class support, which is worth a lot.  It looks as if the 2GB model is the best bet for UHD video stuff - at least initially. (The 1GB model may be a bit tight, and the 4GB model overkill)

* (Little known fact that the Pi3B+ and other Pi models can output 4K30 and below with custom HDMI timings, but don't support 4K hardware accelerated video decode. I've had my Pis running 4K25 as a test in the past)
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#18
From Libreelec site:
The 4B hardware is HDR capable, but software support has a dependency on the new Linux kernel frameworks merged by Intel developers (with help from Team LibreELEC/Kodi) in Linux 5.2 and a kernel bump will be needed to use them. Once the initial excitement and activity from the 4B launch calms down, serious work on HDR and transitioning Raspberry Pi over to the new GBM/V4L2 video pipeline can start.

Also on the list is HBR audio (current audio capabilities are the same as the 3B) and 3D video.

So HDR may come in Libreelec.
HD Audio Passthrough ? (Atmos, DTSHD, TrueHD, DTSX) ?
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#19
(2019-06-24, 11:22)Luminair Wrote: Can't decode 4k h.264.

How much content do you have/receive in 4K h264 ?
Got a Kodi problem? Provide us with a full Debug log (wiki) || Usefull pages: First time user (wiki) || Troubleshooting (wiki) || Free content (wiki) || Forum rules (wiki) || VPN policy (wiki)
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#20
No hardware decoding until kodi 19 Sad the PI 5 may be out by then.

Oh well great upgrade all the same Big Grin
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#21
Finally hardware decoding of HEVC, that took a long while Wink

(2019-06-24, 08:10)tredman Wrote: Dual micro HDMI output

I can see why the RPi foundation went down that path for dual display outputs, But...

microHDMI connectors are really flimsy things, and easily subject to breakage once knocked.
I've already seen such issues with the old ODROID C1.

A full sized HDMI 2.0a/b port would have been much better for mini PC / media player.

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#22
Use plenty of duct tape to firmly immobilize the cable to the underground.
Got a Kodi problem? Provide us with a full Debug log (wiki) || Usefull pages: First time user (wiki) || Troubleshooting (wiki) || Free content (wiki) || Forum rules (wiki) || VPN policy (wiki)
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#23
(2019-06-24, 12:31)Klojum Wrote: Use plenty of duct tape to firmly immobilize the cable to the underground.

official Raspberry duct tape +$5..... LOL
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#24
(2019-06-24, 12:02)solamnic Wrote: From Libreelec site:
The 4B hardware is HDR capable, but software support has a dependency on the new Linux kernel frameworks merged by Intel developers (with help from Team LibreELEC/Kodi) in Linux 5.2 and a kernel bump will be needed to use them. Once the initial excitement and activity from the 4B launch calms down, serious work on HDR and transitioning Raspberry Pi over to the new GBM/V4L2 video pipeline can start.

Also on the list is HBR audio (current audio capabilities are the same as the 3B) and 3D video.

So HDR may come in Libreelec.
HD Audio Passthrough ? (Atmos, DTSHD, TrueHD, DTSX) ?

Yep - suggestion that HEVC 10-bit decode (but not HDR flagging) is supported now, but HDMI output is still 8-bit until more work has been done (I guess HDR flagging and 10-bit output will arrive around the same time?)
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#25
(2019-06-24, 11:05)RockerC Wrote:
(2019-06-24, 10:16)noggin Wrote: Looks like 1080p support (including HEVC/h.265 hardware decode) with audio the same as the Pi 3B+ is currently supported - with ongoing work to support 4K, HDR and HD Audio passthrough.
Does the Raspberry Pi 3+ and/or Raspberry Pi 4 have the drivers and hardware to decode and output HDR10 Media Profile (10-bit High-Dynamic-Range color) in HEVC encoded video at any resolution at all?

Not asking for 4K HDR10 video, but even just 1080p HDR10 video? 

The 4B will support 2160p60 HEVC/h.265 10-bit decode, and HDR output flagging.  Decoding is apparently working already, but limited to 8-bit output without HDR flags. 10-bit output and HDR flagged output is expected to come with later.

Bottom line - the Pi 4B should eventually support UHD Blu-ray rips decoded and output with no compromises, but doesn't currently.

As soon as mine arrives I'll report what the current LibreElec and Raspbian releases support and output.
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#26
HD Audio Passthrough?? (Atmos, DTSHD, TrueHD, DTSX)?
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#27
(2019-06-24, 13:21)solamnic Wrote: HD Audio Passthrough?? (Atmos, DTSHD, TrueHD, DTSX)?

Reports are that the hardware is capable of it (unlike the previous Pis) but software is currently running the same audio support as previously. (i.e. PCM5.1/7.1 lossless decode and output up to 96kHz, and 4.0 lossless decode and output for 192kHz along with DD/DTS passthrough)

I'd expect when DTS HD MA and Dolby True HD arrive - DTS:x and Dolby True HD with Atmos will also arrive (my understanding is that bitstream support for one allows the other)?
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#28
(2019-06-24, 13:40)noggin Wrote: DTS:x and Dolby True HD with Atmos will also arrive (my understanding is that bitstream support for one allows the other)?
Correct, DTS:X and Dolby Atmos make use of previously unused extension frames from the DTS-HD and TrueHD specifications, so in theory anything supporting passthrough of DTS-HD or TrueHD will also support DTS:X and Dolby Atmos. It was done this way to allow them to roll out the new audio formats without requiring consumers to either buy a new player (since decoding is mostly done in hardware in dedicated Blu-ray players) or do a software update (as long as it had full specification compliance in the first place hence the in theory bit).
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#29
All the improvements are great for anyone using Pi as a desktop, server etc.
For Kodi I pretty much just wanted HEVC support and 4K60 display out. Everything else is nice but I won't use it.
It will be interesting to see what they do with the inevitable A model. For Kodi I think you can take a lot of stuff off and still have a great hardware.
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#30
Raspberry Org and Team Kodi!

I'm so excited about the bomb you guys fired today with RPi 4B launch. 

Perhaps you'll find some time to answer me some questions regarding the new star:
  1. Is there any 3D MVC support planned for the new RPi4? Since the SoC is so different, I assume that this is not going to be taken for granted? (@popcornmix )
  2. I understand that Dolby Vision HDR demands license fees to dolby. Will it be an option to purchase such a license as an optional license key like it was for old Raspberries MPEG2 license? This would be a great solution, if possible at all.
Really appreciate what Raspberry Org achieved and does for all the people around the world


@ everybody: Does anybody know about MicroHDMI adaptor limitations? Not that you buy one and then ARC or HD-Audio or 4K is not working with it because of bandwidth limitations or other things that I don't think about... Also: I think it would be better to buy an adaptor cable (like 20cm long ones) as these would be eliminate the mechanical lever stressing on the ports. Also you could tape or fix it easier to the ground.

Have a nice day!
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