Nvidia shield vs Minix Neo u9-h
#16
(2019-08-07, 09:35)sidsilver2 Wrote:
(2019-08-06, 15:06)noggin Wrote:
(2019-08-05, 12:15)wrxtasy Wrote: Rule #1 - don't try and do everything on the one device.

Rule #2 - even though NAS (Network Access Storage) is initially expensive, it can work out as a much simpler setup for Networked media players and downloaded storage in the long term.
More modern LINUX NAS these days can run torrent programs, OTA Broadcasts TV servers, all sort of things. They are a type of Mini PC, and most well known brands are pretty user friendly.

Ruke #3 - That then frees you up to pick any sort of Networked Media player you like, Nvidia Shield, Apple TV, Amazon FireTV Stick, LibreELEC, CoreELEC, Vero 4k+, Windows device etc

THIS  

I'd also go as far as to add a Rule 4.

Rule #4 - Consider whether you are best with two separate media player solutions - one for your DRM-ed streaming platforms (Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, Viaplay, C More etc. etc.) and a separate one for local media playback, Live TV/PVR etc. in Kodi.    
This is what I have done.
To save money I will keep my Minix U1 for Kodi, and use an Amazon fire stick for prime movies and tv shows (glad I kept the stick)
They both work perfectly on the same network.   

Yes - my only comment is that I wouldn't recommend the Amazon Fire TV sticks for Netflix, as that, last time I checked, the Netflix app doesn't support refresh rate switching, so all Netflix content (most of which is either 23.976 or 25fps) is output at 60fps with judder.  The same is true of the BBC iPlayer app (which is a very popular service in the UK)  

Amazon Prime Video IS output correctly with refresh rate switching - so 23.976 and 25fps Amazon content is output at the correct refresh rate.  If you only want the Fire TV for Amazon Prime Video - you're good to go.
Reply
#17
(2019-08-07, 11:50)noggin Wrote:
(2019-08-07, 09:35)sidsilver2 Wrote:
(2019-08-06, 15:06)noggin Wrote: THIS  

I'd also go as far as to add a Rule 4.

Rule #4 - Consider whether you are best with two separate media player solutions - one for your DRM-ed streaming platforms (Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, Viaplay, C More etc. etc.) and a separate one for local media playback, Live TV/PVR etc. in Kodi.    
This is what I have done.
To save money I will keep my Minix U1 for Kodi, and use an Amazon fire stick for prime movies and tv shows (glad I kept the stick)
They both work perfectly on the same network.    

Yes - my only comment is that I wouldn't recommend the Amazon Fire TV sticks for Netflix, as that, last time I checked, the Netflix app doesn't support refresh rate switching, so all Netflix content (most of which is either 23.976 or 25fps) is output at 60fps with judder.  The same is true of the BBC iPlayer app (which is a very popular service in the UK)  

Amazon Prime Video IS output correctly with refresh rate switching - so 23.976 and 25fps Amazon content is output at the correct refresh rate.  If you only want the Fire TV for Amazon Prime Video - you're good to go. 
thanks for the tips guys!

so what would you recommend for netflix then?
Reply
#18
(2019-08-07, 11:50)noggin Wrote:
(2019-08-07, 09:35)sidsilver2 Wrote:
(2019-08-06, 15:06)noggin Wrote: THIS  

I'd also go as far as to add a Rule 4.

Rule #4 - Consider whether you are best with two separate media player solutions - one for your DRM-ed streaming platforms (Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, Viaplay, C More etc. etc.) and a separate one for local media playback, Live TV/PVR etc. in Kodi.    
This is what I have done.
To save money I will keep my Minix U1 for Kodi, and use an Amazon fire stick for prime movies and tv shows (glad I kept the stick)
They both work perfectly on the same network.    

Yes - my only comment is that I wouldn't recommend the Amazon Fire TV sticks for Netflix, as that, last time I checked, the Netflix app doesn't support refresh rate switching, so all Netflix content (most of which is either 23.976 or 25fps) is output at 60fps with judder.  The same is true of the BBC iPlayer app (which is a very popular service in the UK)  

Amazon Prime Video IS output correctly with refresh rate switching - so 23.976 and 25fps Amazon content is output at the correct refresh rate.  If you only want the Fire TV for Amazon Prime Video - you're good to go. 

Don't have Netflix so its not a problem, watched a film last night on Prime for the first time on the fire stick and was in full HD, what a difference from the Minix.
Reply
#19
(2019-08-07, 12:29)jimenez_e Wrote:
(2019-08-07, 11:50)noggin Wrote:
(2019-08-07, 09:35)sidsilver2 Wrote: This is what I have done.
To save money I will keep my Minix U1 for Kodi, and use an Amazon fire stick for prime movies and tv shows (glad I kept the stick)
They both work perfectly on the same network.    

Yes - my only comment is that I wouldn't recommend the Amazon Fire TV sticks for Netflix, as that, last time I checked, the Netflix app doesn't support refresh rate switching, so all Netflix content (most of which is either 23.976 or 25fps) is output at 60fps with judder.  The same is true of the BBC iPlayer app (which is a very popular service in the UK)  

Amazon Prime Video IS output correctly with refresh rate switching - so 23.976 and 25fps Amazon content is output at the correct refresh rate.  If you only want the Fire TV for Amazon Prime Video - you're good to go. 
thanks for the tips guys!

so what would you recommend for netflix then?

The Apple TV HD or 4K, because it’s the only external media player that can do Netflix audio Frame Rate Matching. It will also support Netflix DolbyVision and output lossy Atmos audio as well.

Apple and its tvOS App developers seem to actually realise there is varied Frame Rate content produced worldwide and support Frame Matching for smooth video playback with a lot of Apps for those that live outside the USA.

Reply
#20
(2019-08-07, 13:26)wrxtasy Wrote: The Apple TV HD or 4K, because it’s the only external media player that can do Netflix audio Frame Rate Matching. It will also support Netflix DolbyVision and output lossy Atmos audio as well.

Eh? The Roku Streaming Stick + is a heck of a lot cheaper and does Auto Frame Rate matching on Netflix and Amazon Prime (as well as iPlayer). If you are looking for a simple, streaming solution to run alongside a separate box with Kodi (i.e. don't need to run Kodi/MrMC on the Roku) it's a good solution. It doesn't do Dolby Vision but it does do HDR10 and HLG (so will do the UHD HLG HDR BBC iPlayer stuff properly)

***EDIT : Grr - just as I type this I discover that Netflix - and only Netflix - no longer has automatic frame rate switching on the Roku.  It looks like it was disabled sometime in late June/early July ***
Reply
#21
Wow, did not know that. I can see why the Roku dominates the cheap streaming hardware / Apps market then.

Reply
#22
(2019-08-08, 02:25)wrxtasy Wrote: Wow, did not know that. I can see why the Roku dominates the cheap streaming hardware / Apps market then.

Except - Roku/Netflix have for some reason (possibly for UI Menu trailer reasons (*)) disabled refresh rate switching for Netflix on Roku hardware that supports it at the moment... Everything else switches frame rate fine, just not Netflix. This was a regression introduced in July I believe. Very annoying. It went from being perfect to being almost as flawed as the Amazon Fire TVs...

(*) The Roku was, at one point, re-syncing frame rates as trailers auto-played within the UI - so as you went from the 60p UI to trailers for 24p series to trailers for 25p series you got re-syncs. It may be that the Roku API doesn't allow you to disable frame rate switching selectively within a Channel/Application for certain - so they disabled it globally for Netflix. Major step backwards.
Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average



Logout Mark Read Team Forum Stats Members Help
Nvidia shield vs Minix Neo u9-h00