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Android NVIDIA Shield TV Pro (2019 new model)
(2020-06-26, 11:28)Hitcher Wrote: Firstly, have you calibrated your TV for SDR and HDR?

Hey there,

TV has been calibrated according to Rtings settings. Besides, it's clear as day that the Shield is at fault. For example, if I set the "Custom display mode" to 4K 60Hz, YUV 422 12-bit Rec 709 DV Ready, then plex interface and SDR video looks good, but clearly HDR video does not has I don't get full colors.

If I set the "Custom display mode" to be 4K 59Hz YUV 420 12 bit REC 2020 HDR & DV, HDR looks great but now the plex interface and SDR looks washed out. If I enable "Match content color space" *now*, the colors are over-saturated, especially skin tones.

So essentially I'm forced to manually switch between the 2 modes if I am watching HDR content or not, which is something I really don't want to do Sad
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So I thought I had the latest update for my SHIELD. Turns out latest is 8.1.1 which specifically fixes this issue. Now the "Match content color space" works! Seems this update is fairly recent (last few months), so for anyone else, give it a try Smile
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(2020-05-24, 10:54)noggin Wrote:
(2020-05-24, 09:38)Theetjuh Wrote:
(2020-05-23, 15:04)Ogreen Wrote: OS is 64 bits on Shield TV Wink
But since this is a topic about the Pro version, he is correct  
And since he didn't specify the model I think it's useful to clarify for those who might read that post and think all Shield TV's are 64-bit generically.

Yep, 64 bit for the PRO, and 32 bits for the "tube" version Wink
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In trying to play a couple of her movies through Kodi however they'll play for about 10 seconds then freeze. And that'll virtually render Kodi useless until I exit and restart.

The same movies play fine in Plex.

Any settings I need to change to get this working? 1080p movies are fine.
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To receive meaningful assistance you will need to provide a full debug log.

The instructions are here... debug log (wiki)

If you are using the Basic Method, then ensure the following is applied...
1.Enable debugging in Settings>System Settings>Logging,
2.Restart Kodi
3.Replicate the problem.
4.Upload the log to Kodi Paste Site manually or use the Kodi Logfile Uploader. (wiki) With either method post the link to the log back here.

If you are using the Advanced Method ensure you have correctly created and applied the advancedsettings.xml file (wiki)

In both instances, you should see the word DEBUG throughout the log.

Note: Full logs only. No partial or redacted logs
Do NOT post your logs directly into the forum. Use the Kodi Paste Site. Post the link to your pasted log in the forum
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I own a 2015 shield tv and mainly use it for Kodi. Is it worth buying the newest model?
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(2020-07-02, 03:54)Tatts4Life Wrote: Is it worth buying the newest model?
Not if you're happy with what it's doing.
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Update on my issue with it not running 4k HDR. Turns out in the audio settings i'd turned passthrough on and enabled all the sound options. One of them was TrueHD which was what the film was running, seems my AV doesn't support it so it locked everything up.

Disabled that option and everything was fine
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(2019-11-04, 20:22)mattmarsden Wrote: Will the new Shield do player led DV?
 
(2019-11-05, 13:08)noggin Wrote:
(2019-11-05, 03:26)wrxtasy Wrote: The exceptions are LG and the 2019 Panasonic’s OLED’s that get the full Monty - TV led - DolbyVision treatment, and they also produce superior DV picture output as a result. 

What's the basis for that ? Isn't the difference between player-led and TV-led DV just the different routes that metadata takes? In TV-led (which is backwards compatible with HDMI implementations that otherwise only support static HDR metadata) the DV metadata is 'hidden' in the active video signal through tunnelling (which means the TV has to process the incoming video via DV-aware hardware to detect and extract the metadata), and some players may also have to be able to embed the metadata within the active video (presumably whilst it merges the dual HDR10 and DV enhancement video streams?).

With player-led DV the metadata is extracted from the DV video stream (or enhancement layer in dual stream UHD Blu-Ray ?), in the player, and sent separately over HDMI using HDMI's dynamic metadata pathways that were added in later. As a result the TV has no requirement to process the HDMI video signal to extract the metadata, as it is supplied using HDMI standardised signalling pathways (rather than using a tunnelling hack?)

What aspects of player-led vs TV-led metadata introduces a quality difference for the two routes? Or am I missing something obvious?

AIUI TV-led DV was always an interim system Dolby introduced to bypass the lack of progress in HDMI supporting dynamic HDR metadata?
 
(2019-11-05, 03:26)wrxtasy Wrote:
(2019-11-04, 20:22)mattmarsden Wrote: Will the new Shield do player led DV?

Yes all these App streaming DolbyVision capable media players like Apple TV 4K, FireTV 4K / Cube & 2019 Shield all use single layer - player led DV profile 5 for streaming.

A lot of the cheap (and not so cheap in the case of Sony) 4K HDR DV TV’s also implement - player led DV - only as well.

The exceptions are LG and the 2019 Panasonic’s OLED’s that get the full Monty - TV led - DolbyVision treatment, and they also produce superior DV picture output as a result.
So, is the shield sending a "player-led" dolby vision signal to whatever TV or is it counting on the TV having "TV-led"?
If the shield sends "player-led", does it also process profile 4 dolby vision, with an enhancement layer? Im reading ppl making UHD backups and playing on plex etc (hopefully soon kodi) with enhancement layer intact, single layer not dual layer, so the enhancement layer is within the same stream, there are tools that do this.
im wondering because i recently discovered my Sony OLED only has player-led dolby vision, so i must know if the Shield processes baselayer+enhancement layer before sending to TV?

Thank you
(2019-11-05, 18:41)noggin Wrote:
(2019-11-05, 18:16)wesk05 Wrote:
(2019-11-05, 13:58)noggin Wrote: If the difference is just reported subjective differences between different TVs displaying DV content and those two TVs are using different DV metadata routes - then I'd avoid any assumption of correlation meaning causation - the differences could be in DV performance and nothing to do with the metadata delivery system. It could just be that the Dolby result on some models is different to others. Unless someone is actually doing objective tests demonstrating a difference with DV test signals on a display that supports both metadata routes.
The difference being reported between "player -led" and "TV-led" Dolby Vision is likely due to profile limitations and encoding differences. Profile 5 if encoded with 12-bit PQ remapping is likely to look very similar to profile 7 "TV-led" rendering. If there is no remapping done, then profile 5 content is limited to 1000 nits.  

@wesk05 What does this mean for a UHD Blu-ray with Dolby Vision being played on a TV-led UHD Blu-ray player vs a Player-led UHD Blu-ray player? (Same dual stream source - but one using tunnelled metadata, the other using HDMI dynamic metadata?)

I never saw if this was answered?
Would a UHD player who is new enough, like the Sony x700 combine the baselayer and enhancement layer and then send it to the TV?

Thanks
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(2020-07-23, 18:47)box4m Wrote: I never saw if this was answered?
Would a UHD player who is new enough, like the Sony x700 combine the baselayer and enhancement layer and then send it to the TV?
Thanks

All DV players will need to combine base layers and enhancement layers from the disc during replay surely?

It's important not to confuse carriage of dynamic metadata (tunnelled 'hidden' within video or carried via now-standard HDMI paths) and the route to merging HDR10 base layers with additional DV enhancement layers. In SOME cases the enhancement layer may actually contain very little other than metadata it's true - but in some cases it can have quite a lot of additional content I believe - though that's a disc mastering decision.  

The original first gen DV standard that used tunnelling was a kind of hack/kludge to allow DV dynamic metadata to be carried when there was no standard way to do so.  It therefore embedded this data content within the actual video signal, and required early DV TVs to be able to recognise this and remove it from the actual video signal (which will have had a bit of a processing overhead I think - and required some significant processing within the actual active video path to capture the metadata).  

The more recent players and TVs have been able to do this using standardised HDMI signalling (now there is a standard), and some more recent TVs and players can only output or display DV that uses this.  (This is the so-called LLDV stuff - though I'm not sure what the Low Latency refers to - unless it's because it avoids having to process the video in both the player and the display to add and remove the dynamic metadata in the non-LLDV flavour of DV?)

I don't think any consumer DV UHD BD players - whether outputting metadata tunnelled or via standard HDMI routes - ignore the enhancement layer, I don't think they'd be licensed if they did that.
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(2020-07-23, 21:28)noggin Wrote:
(2020-07-23, 18:47)box4m Wrote: I never saw if this was answered?
Would a UHD player who is new enough, like the Sony x700 combine the baselayer and enhancement layer and then send it to the TV?
Thanks

All DV players will need to combine base layers and enhancement layers from the disc during replay surely?

It's important not to confuse carriage of dynamic metadata (tunnelled 'hidden' within video or carried via now-standard HDMI paths) and the route to merging HDR10 base layers with additional DV enhancement layers. In SOME cases the enhancement layer may actually contain very little other than metadata it's true - but in some cases it can have quite a lot of additional content I believe - though that's a disc mastering decision.  

The original first gen DV standard that used tunnelling was a kind of hack/kludge to allow DV dynamic metadata to be carried when there was no standard way to do so.  It therefore embedded this data content within the actual video signal, and required early DV TVs to be able to recognise this and remove it from the actual video signal (which will have had a bit of a processing overhead I think - and required some significant processing within the actual active video path to capture the metadata).  

The more recent players and TVs have been able to do this using standardised HDMI signalling (now there is a standard), and some more recent TVs and players can only output or display DV that uses this.  (This is the so-called LLDV stuff - though I'm not sure what the Low Latency refers to - unless it's because it avoids having to process the video in both the player and the display to add and remove the dynamic metadata in the non-LLDV flavour of DV?)

I don't think any consumer DV UHD BD players - whether outputting metadata tunnelled or via standard HDMI routes - ignore the enhancement layer, I don't think they'd be licensed if they did that.

Thank you for reply and information
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Just my thoughts on this...

On the Oppo you can chose player led or TV led, all I can say is player led is noticeably darker.

I would say that LG knows the capability of its C9 panel and it can map the DoVi tone to the best of its capabilities, whereas the player doesn’t know the screens capabilities and sends out standard mapping which is possibly resulting in clipping.

Which is technically accurate? Possibly neither but I know which one looks better.
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(2020-07-25, 09:10)DaMacFunkin Wrote: Just my thoughts on this...

On the Oppo you can chose player led or TV led, all I can say is player led is noticeably darker.

I would say that LG knows the capability of its C9 panel and it can map the DoVi tone to the best of its capabilities, whereas the player doesn’t know the screens capabilities and sends out standard mapping which is possibly resulting in clipping.

Which is technically accurate? Possibly neither but I know which one looks better.

I don't understand what you're suggesting?  Unless I'm very wrong (@wesk05) I thought Player-led vs TV-led was the route the DV metadata took from source to sink (and the processing based on this metadata was carried out in the display irrespective of this).  I thought the difference was whether the DV metadata (which I think is derived from the RPU?) was either carried over HDMI using now-standard protocols, where previously the DV metadata had to be tunnelled within the active HDMI video (and detected and 'un tunnelled' in the display)

Is this not the case - is the Player-led vs Display-led instead to do with how the BL+EL+RPU stuff is processed either in the player or the TV ?
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Hey guys waiting for my shield tv pro to arrive and would like to get some info what settings in kodi ppl are using.
Do i leave shield res at 4k and kodi at 4k and leave it at that?
Or shield at 4k and kodi at 1080p and enable adjust display refresh rate along with whitelist?

Cheers guys
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(2020-07-25, 11:16)noggin Wrote: I don't understand what you're suggesting?  Unless I'm very wrong (@wesk05) I thought Player-led vs TV-led was the route the DV metadata took from source to sink (and the processing based on this metadata was carried out in the display irrespective of this).  I thought the difference was whether the DV metadata (which I think is derived from the RPU?) was either carried over HDMI using now-standard protocols, where previously the DV metadata had to be tunnelled within the active HDMI video (and detected and 'un tunnelled' in the display)

Is this not the case - is the Player-led vs Display-led instead to do with how the BL+EL+RPU stuff is processed either in the player or the TV ?
From a purely technical stand point, there shouldn't be any difference between player-led vs TV-led modes for profile 7 media on Ultra-HD Blu-ray players. User reports (like that of @DaMacFunkin) suggest that this is not always the case. You may occasionally see noticeable difference between player-led and TV-led modes in certain scenes. One likely explanation for this is subtle differences in ST2084 EOTF application in the two modes.
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