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Android NVIDIA Shield TV Pro (2019 new model)
Im not sure if here is the right forum. I have Kodi on the 2019 Shield. The 4k remuxes does not show the right hdr colors, but the files .mt2s on full UHD bluray make a handshake and start showing the right hdr colors after a few seconds.
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(2020-05-23, 13:45)ragico Wrote:
(2020-05-10, 14:12)Bonz Wrote: Hello Shield"19 owners,

I want to buy the new Shield Tv Pro to connect with my Oled C9 & soundbar HW-Q80r but can't find it for sale anywere in Portugal and all Europe. Could someone please help me out?

It is on sale today in Italy, Germany, UK, France at 219,00 euro.

In Amazon?
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No, at nvidia.com directly:

https://www.nvidia.com/de-de/shield/buy/#

but it is already sold out again at least in Germany. I got mine today. Wink
frontend software - tvOS | android tv | win10 | kodi stable
frontend hardware - apple tv | nvidia shield tv | sonos 5.1 | samsung 1080p
backend software - debian | proxmox | omv | zfs raid-z2 | docker | emby | tvheadend | fhem | unifi
backend hardware - supermicro x11ssh-ctf | xeon | ecc | wd red | dd max s8
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(2020-05-29, 19:08)hoppel118 Wrote: No, at nvidia.com directly:

https://www.nvidia.com/de-de/shield/buy/#

but it is already sold out again at least in Germany. I got mine today. Wink

Still available in Italy and UK
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Is there any combination of Kodi settings that will have Kodi output Dolby Atmos over an ARC connection using the DD+ codec?
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(2020-06-11, 01:06)Dave_O Wrote: Is there any combination of Kodi settings that will have Kodi output Dolby Atmos over an ARC connection using the DD+ codec?

Pretty sure that's a no. For starters I think you need e-arc for Atmos.
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(2020-06-11, 01:06)Dave_O Wrote: Is there any combination of Kodi settings that will have Kodi output Dolby Atmos over an ARC connection using the DD+ codec?

If you have a modern 4K TV that is advertised with "Atmos" capabilities you will find that it can also accept lossless Dolby TrueHD/Atmos from any HD audio passthru capable Kodi media player.

AND those Atmos TV's will then remix that THD/Atmos audio into DD+/Atmos which can then be sent out via regular HDMI ARC.***

***Tested with my Atmos capable GZ Panasonic OLED.
I believe LG 4K HDR Atmos capable TV are the same.
Sony Atmos 4K HDR TV's as very likely as well to have the same capabilities.

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A more detailed explanation -
Quote:I was recently discussing with Australian integrator @hemant Daya​ the use of HDMI ARC to deliver Dolby Atmos sound from the Netflix app in a TV back to an AVR. But ARC doesn't support Atmos, right? Well, not until the next generation eARC, that is. So why then does it appear to work (sometimes)? The answer is a little complex, and I felt well worth sharing...

Firstly, a little background. HDMI Audio Return Channel (ARC) is based on the IEC 60958-1 specification, which is essentially the S/PDIF audio spec. There's two types of ARC in HDMI; Single Mode and Common Mode, but unfortunately we don't get informed as to which type any given product supports. 

Single Mode ARC uses a single wire in the HDMI link, with performance limited to around 3Mbps. This enables support for 2.0 LPCM and "lossy" compressed surround formats including Dolby Digital and DTS 5.1, but nothing more. Cable length is a huge factor with Single mode, with reliability typically getting flaky beyond about 7-8m in a passive HDMI cable. 

Common Mode ARC is superior, but less common (excusing the pun) in terms of deployment. It's still based on the same S/PDIF spec, but can theoretically support up to around 12Mbps. This is enough to carry 24-bit 192kHz 2-channel audio, or — to the point of this blog — a Dolby format called E-AC-3, which we know better as Dolby Digital Plus. This can also carry Metadata-enhanced Audio Transmission (MAT), being audio objects; aka Atmos.

So existing HDMI ARC can potentially support Dolby Atmos by maxing out the Common mode capability with an MAT stream. But there's a huge catch. Two, actually;

  1. Channel count & resolution — while E-AC-3 can support up to 15.1 channels of audio, it's well beyond the HDMI ARC spec. Even getting 7.1 channels to pass is a stretch, so even if the stream contains object metadata, it will lack the resolution and height speakers. 
  2. System support — getting Atmos to work through HDMI ARC requires Common mode support in both the TV and AVR, and a high integrity link in-between. Even then, performance will be marginal.
HDMI 2.1 will change things considerably. It introduces enhanced ARC, or eARC for short, which can support up to twelve times the bandwidth of ARC, supporting up to 32 channels of 24-bit 192kHz audio! That is, eARC will support all of the same audio formats upstream as what we can already get in a downstream HDMI link.  

In summary, a basic, lower resolution form of Dolby Atmos may work through existing HDMI ARC, but it is highly system and link dependent. This is why we tend to generalise that ARC doesn't support Atmos, as it's out of spec and can't be relied upon. If you are designing this capability into systems, sticking with proven product combinations and short connectivity can give your systems an edge until eARC comes along and opens up our options.

https://community.cedia.net/blogs/david-...r-hdmi-arc
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(2020-06-11, 09:03)Hitcher Wrote:
(2020-06-11, 01:06)Dave_O Wrote: Is there any combination of Kodi settings that will have Kodi output Dolby Atmos over an ARC connection using the DD+ codec?

Pretty sure that's a no. For starters I think you need e-arc for Atmos.
I did too, until I got a Sonos Arc soundbar. My setup is Shield -> Samsung Q9fn -> Sonos Arc via HDMI ARC (not eARC). Streaming apps on the Shield like Netflix, Amazon Video, and Disney+ use DD+ as a transport for lossy Atmos, and play Atmos content fine. The Leaf file here - https://www.dolby.com/us/en/guide/dolby-...ilers.html uses the DD+ codec and plays ATMOS with Kodi, according to the Sonos App which can display codec info about the movie playing. I use Kodi's audio transcoding feature to play files with a DTS soundtrack, and was hoping that there was some setting to do the same with TrueHD Atmos content.
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(2020-06-11, 09:42)wrxtasy Wrote:
(2020-06-11, 01:06)Dave_O Wrote: Is there any combination of Kodi settings that will have Kodi output Dolby Atmos over an ARC connection using the DD+ codec?

If you have a modern 4K TV that is advertised with "Atmos" capabilities you will find that it can also accept lossless Dolby TrueHD/Atmos from any HD audio passthru capable Kodi media player.

AND those Atmos TV's will then remix that THD/Atmos audio into DD+/Atmos which can then be sent out via regular HDMI ARC.***

***Tested with my Atmos capable GZ Panasonic OLED.
I believe LG 4K HDR Atmos capable TV are the same.
Sony Atmos 4K HDR TV's as very likely as well to have the same capabilities.
At least my ATMOS capable LG OLED B8 is not capable of that.
Reply
(2020-06-11, 11:21)Hitcher Wrote: A more detailed explanation -
Quote:I was recently discussing with Australian integrator @hemant Daya​ the use of HDMI ARC to deliver Dolby Atmos sound from the Netflix app in a TV back to an AVR. But ARC doesn't support Atmos, right? Well, not until the next generation eARC, that is. So why then does it appear to work (sometimes)? The answer is a little complex, and I felt well worth sharing...

Firstly, a little background. HDMI Audio Return Channel (ARC) is based on the IEC 60958-1 specification, which is essentially the S/PDIF audio spec. There's two types of ARC in HDMI; Single Mode and Common Mode, but unfortunately we don't get informed as to which type any given product supports. 

Single Mode ARC uses a single wire in the HDMI link, with performance limited to around 3Mbps. This enables support for 2.0 LPCM and "lossy" compressed surround formats including Dolby Digital and DTS 5.1, but nothing more. Cable length is a huge factor with Single mode, with reliability typically getting flaky beyond about 7-8m in a passive HDMI cable. 

Common Mode ARC is superior, but less common (excusing the pun) in terms of deployment. It's still based on the same S/PDIF spec, but can theoretically support up to around 12Mbps. This is enough to carry 24-bit 192kHz 2-channel audio, or — to the point of this blog — a Dolby format called E-AC-3, which we know better as Dolby Digital Plus. This can also carry Metadata-enhanced Audio Transmission (MAT), being audio objects; aka Atmos.

So existing HDMI ARC can potentially support Dolby Atmos by maxing out the Common mode capability with an MAT stream. But there's a huge catch. Two, actually;
 
  1. Channel count & resolution — while E-AC-3 can support up to 15.1 channels of audio, it's well beyond the HDMI ARC spec. Even getting 7.1 channels to pass is a stretch, so even if the stream contains object metadata, it will lack the resolution and height speakers. 
  2. System support — getting Atmos to work through HDMI ARC requires Common mode support in both the TV and AVR, and a high integrity link in-between. Even then, performance will be marginal.
HDMI 2.1 will change things considerably. It introduces enhanced ARC, or eARC for short, which can support up to twelve times the bandwidth of ARC, supporting up to 32 channels of 24-bit 192kHz audio! That is, eARC will support all of the same audio formats upstream as what we can already get in a downstream HDMI link.  

In summary, a basic, lower resolution form of Dolby Atmos may work through existing HDMI ARC, but it is highly system and link dependent. This is why we tend to generalise that ARC doesn't support Atmos, as it's out of spec and can't be relied upon. If you are designing this capability into systems, sticking with proven product combinations and short connectivity can give your systems an edge until eARC comes along and opens up our options.

https://community.cedia.net/blogs/david-...r-hdmi-arc
Thanks for this - I wasn't aware of the two flavours of regular ARC - there's more here :

https://www.ap.com/technical-library/more-about-arc/

plus googling some data sheets .

Single Mode uses just the HEAC+ (Utility)  pin to carry SPDIF audio relative to ground.
Common Mode uses the HEAC+ (Utility)  and HEAC- (HPD - Hot Plug Detect) summed together relative to ground, whilst also allowing the HEAC+ and HEAC- to carry differential Ethernet data bidirectionally.   If your devices support HDMI Ethernet connectivity (is this really deployed much?) then they are likely to use Common Mode.  There is a suggestion that HDMI Ethernet cables may be better for Common Mode connectivity, though non-HDMI Ethernet cables will work in many cases it appears.
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Hello everyone, I was hoping for someone to tell me about your experience running Kodi on the NVIDIA Shield Pro? I am currently searching for a new box and I am between this one and odroid (but that one is not currently in stock). I pretty much use Kodi for 1080p/iptv/4k (eventually) using shared folders. I am checking out this thread, but just wanted to check if there is something I need to take into account before getting one. Thanks!
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(2020-06-22, 16:19)Inferno. Wrote: Hello everyone, I was hoping for someone to tell me about your experience running Kodi on the NVIDIA Shield Pro? I am currently searching for a new box and I am between this one and odroid (but that one is not currently in stock). I pretty much use Kodi for 1080p/iptv/4k (eventually) using shared folders. I am checking out this thread, but just wanted to check if there is something I need to take into account before getting one. Thanks!
So...here's my two cents. 

Kodi works good on the Shield, great even. I do not have any complaints, but truth be told I don't use it a ton on the Shield.

That said if Kodi is ALL you are after, I personally prefer coreelec to run Kodi over android, it is super stable and "just works". The Shield brings much more to the table than an Odroid device, 
so for all around get the Shield. For just Kodi I would seriously consider something like an odroid.

Not sure which model you were looking at but I would consider the N2 and the C4. C4 should be plenty fine for Kodi unless you need to software decide 1080p with the Netflix addon.
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Hey Guys,

My C9 just arrived yesterday. I was using an Nvidia Shield 2019 previously and I want to keep using it with the LG C9. The problem I'm having is that the moment I select 4k 59Hz HDR10 + Dolby Vision mode, while HDR / Dolby Vision works great, any other content (including the interface of Plex / Netflix etc), comes out "washed out". Colors are not saturated etc. I tried to compare the native Plex App on LG and the plex app on the shield and the difference is clear, same TV settings.

If I select Rec. 709 YUV 444 8-Bit, SDR content and the plex interface looks normal via the Shield, but obviously HDR and DV is not working.

If I select "Match content color space" option in the Shield, colors are over-saturated, especially skin color.

Is there no way to make the Shield play nice with the C9? 

NVIDIA Shield 2019 Firmware Version: 8.1.0
LG C9 Firmware Version: 04.80.03
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Firstly, have you calibrated your TV for SDR and HDR?
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