XBMC/Kodi port on Matchstick open source $18 HDMI stick with Firefox OS?
#1
Matchstick is currently running a Kickstarter campaign for their very cheap HDMI stick with Firefox OS which features an open bootloader.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mat...firefox-os

Wondering what is the chance of seeing a XBMC/Kodi ported to it and run under Firefox OS on ARM as this stick comes already rooted?


Someone unpacked and analysed its firmware and it looks like based on Android 4.2.2 and uses latest Rockchip RK3066 kernel (3.0.36)

http://www.matchstick.tv/developers/docu...stick.html


For only $18(US) the Matchstick hardware is based on Rockchip RK3066 SoC with Dual-Core CPU, 1GB RAM, and 4GB NAND.

Previously codenamed "Mozilla Netcast" the product is otherwise kind-of essentially an open Chromecast without mirroring functionality.

http://hacks.mozilla.org/2014/09/matchst...per-stick/



Matchstick.tv claim that the platform is totally open source software and open source hardware.


Mozilla normally doesn’t allow native C++ applications to run on Firefox OS 1.4 however Matchstick is suppose to be rooted by default?
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#2
Nice, they even have the hardware files already online.
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#3
(2014-10-02, 17:49)Ned Scott Wrote: Nice, they even have the hardware files already online.
Yes, as such someone could in theory even take their hardware schematics, contact a Chinese company for manufacturing, and release their own stick with same design.

Again they say that Matchstick is a completely OPEN hardware and software platform under Creative Commons ShareAlike 3.0 and MPL 2.0 licenses.

http://www.matchstick.tv/developers/hardware.html

"Open source hardware and software means there are no limitations to what you can do with Matchstick. No need to jailbreak your Matchstick, the door is wide open!"


In addition they are offering early Matchstick prototypes available for free to qualified developers, but not sure XBMC/Kodi quality when it is not a just a simple web app.
http://www.matchstick.tv/developers/register.html

XBMC Remote app or similar would probably quality though
http://wiki.xbmc.org/index.php?title=Off...BMC_Remote
http://wiki.xbmc.org/index.php?title=XBM...Windows%29


And in theory it should of course also be possible for someone to make a Android or Linux firmware/distribution for the Matchstick too.

MK808B (RK903) KitKat kernel is for example made very similar hardware https://github.com/BalintBanyasz/kernel_....0-rbox-kk
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#4
KDDI have announced their "Open Web Board" which is another Firefox OS based open sourced HDMI TV stick powered by Rockchip RK3066.

http://liliputing.com/2014/10/kddi-mozil...ox-os.html

Also open source, other than price, the main difference between it and MatchStick is that KDDI Open Web Board supports Bluetooth LE

http://news.kddi.com/kddi/corporate/engl...3/684.html

KDDI Open Web Board specifications:
  • SoC – Rockchip RK3066 dual core Cortex A9 processor @ 1.6 Ghz with Mali-400 MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 1 GB RAM
  • Storage – 8 GB flash
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x micro USB for power
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi (AP6210 module), Bluetooth 2.1 (HFP/A2DP/AVRCP)/4.0 GATT
  • Optional Zigbee via external module via USB
KDDI have said that the Open Web Board is primary aimed at embedded and developers who want to create apps for Firefox OS.
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#5
BalintBanyasz, a ROM developer on Freaktab, have now ported Matchstick's Firefox OS firmware to the once very popular MK808B HDMI stick

http://www.freaktab.com/showthread.php?1...Firefox-OS

Matchstick's firmware is apparently a customized Firefox OS based on Android 4.2.2 with RK3066 kernel (3.0.36) instead of just standard Firefox OS.


Other popular Android HDMI sticks that features similar hardware are Uhost U2, Probox2 Ultimate, and Minix Neo X5 which all uses Rockchip RK3066 SoC and RK903 WiFi chip.

No point in buying those now that MatchStick is so cheap, but cool if you happen to have one lying around or find one for free.
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#6
I would think that it might very well only be possible to run XBMC headless as a server app on Firefox OS.

http://cyanlabs.net/Thread-Guide-Headles...-for-Linux

Native C/C++ applications without GUI are at least known to run well on Firefox OS.



Headless XBMC is also known as having XBMC's core minified as a server, google "xbmc headless" or see

http://forum.xbmc.org/showthread.php?tid=132919

This means that XBMC will run as a background service or deamon without its existng GUI.


You can still have a GUI, but a web GUI, hence it will not be the exact GUI and skins you know today.

http://wiki.xbmc.org/index.php?title=Web_interface

So at the very least headless XBMC server should run fine on Firefox OS with a web interface as GUI.
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#7
(2014-10-03, 11:06)Hedda Wrote: Again they say that Matchstick is a completely OPEN hardware and software platform under Creative Commons ShareAlike 3.0 and MPL 2.0 licenses.

http://www.matchstick.tv/developers/hardware.html

"Open source hardware and software means there are no limitations to what you can do with Matchstick. No need to jailbreak your Matchstick, the door is wide open!"

It's not really "open hardware", as there're licenses for software there are for hardware and calling it open hardware isn't licensing.
The only license that mentioned in related to the hardware side is "Creative Commons – Attribution ShareAlike 3.0" which isn't a hardware (nor software) license.
Quote:2. All hardware reference designs provided by Matchstick are under the Creative Commons – Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 license. You hereby agree to be bound (LOL) to the terms and conditions of Creative Commons – Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 license for use of any hardware reference designs provided by Matchstick. Dream it, build it, share it!

Here's one example what OSHW licence defines clearly
Quote:The hardware must be released with documentation including design files, and must allow modification and distribution of the design files
so please don't call a hardware that its designs distribute as PDF crap an open hardware, it's not.
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#8
dhead, you make good points. I do however think it is good for open hardware concepts to be brought more out into the open, which these projects certainly do.

The essential difference is that everyone can use a computer to write/change/compile software, not many of us have the wherewithal to create complex PCBs, do SMT soldering or even source the components for rolling their own hardware. So open hardware is somewhat less accessible for the average Joe.

But it is certainly good to see the subject getting more exposure, and hopefully the people who don't quite understand your points, and why it is bad to have silly licenses and pdf files, can be persuaded otherwise Smile
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